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Yesterday I was cleaning my tank (Syphon) and I noticed these little thin worms that look like little cat hair and the longer I stared @ them they started wiggling. And the only thing left in my tank is a Pleco and a chinese algae eater The piranhas I had have been sold. And My RHOMB will be here on Monday/Tuesday from Rodgers Aquatics.
 

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I'm no expert but probably planeria. I have the same problem. Come supposedly from over feeding and harmless to fish. From my understanding everyone says they're in every tank but you don't see them until your tank gets over run with them. From what I know to get rid of them reduce feeding and step up water changes. So that's what I'm doing at the moment. Maybe someone else has input.
 

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nothing to worry about i dont' think that type of worm will bother your fish, i would maybe do a high salt content, for a few days along with regular water changes a few time sa week
 

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Should I double the dose of salt.
Look at the high salt dose thread. Pretty sure it's 1 pound salt per 100 gallons per day for 3 days.
 

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Planaria

I've been fighting with them for a while. Apparently, they're always in your tap water in a spore. They reproduce Asexually (by themselves) and will remain as long as there is a food source. If you stop feeding for a couple of days, clean your filters (reproducing grounds) and do a gravel vac, eventually they will either disappear from sight (always in the tank) or their numbers will be greatly reduced.

I did the salt thing and it didn't kill the worms... at all.

I pulled this offline and it seems helpful:
Belong to the Turbellaria. Depending on species between 5 and 20 mm. They feed on small organisms(Daphnia, cyclops) but also on fish eggs and young fish. Asexual reproduction. Planaria can be observed by turning on the light during the night, or in the morning when the light goes on. They will be attached to the tanks' sides, and will quickly head for darkness. Treatments are mostly biological and mechanical. The mechanical treatment is to insert meat in a container, and removing all accumulated planaria every morning for a period of two weeks(Longer if necesary). Biological treatments; some labyrinthfish will eat planaria, for example the paradise fish Macropodus Opercularis, Trichogaster Trichopterus and Trichogaster Pectoralis, but also Epalzeorhynchus kallopterus. Actually most fish will eat planaria if hungry enough, so not feeding for a week may fix the problem by itself.

As for chemical treatments, some standard anti-snail medications like eSHa gastropex also effectively remove planaria.
 
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