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I have made my piranhas suffer for too long. They have gone without water changes or any treatments for 6 months. Suddenly I ran across a deal for 4 Caribe that whipped me into shape.

I have done many water changes over the last week removing all kinds of waste off of the bottom of my tank (the five gallon buckets look like grape cool-aid when filled) Finally when I look from underneath my tank I see clean rocks and gravel, also I have switched out all the filters on my penguin filters, I have added salt...in proper 1 tablespoon per 5 gallon's, and I have added the recommended treatment for Ammonia. My water is crystal clear and the piranhas ¿seem? to be doing better? I went to the store to buy a "water checker" (very layman's) and I stumbled across this little PH gauge that hangs on your tank and depending on its shade will reveal what the waters current PH is.

Well I didn't have time to wait the 1-2 hours for it to "fill" as I had to go to school, but when I get home I will be anxious to see what it is. Problem is, I don't know what to hope for. And even worse, what more do I do if it's NOT RIGHT?!?!?

Actually while were at it, if I pick up some sort of tester to check Ammonia and all that other good junk what are ALL the levels to shoot for? Anyone?

Kyle
 

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I will bite your face!
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6.8 ish.
depending on what way you need to go.
Adding drift wood is a good way to lower PH adding calcium heavy substrate in your filter is a way to raise it.
Or you can do it chemichaly. With stuff like "PH Up/PH down"
 

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I have made my piranhas suffer for too long. They have gone without water changes or any treatments for 6 months. Suddenly I ran across a deal for 4 Caribe that whipped me into shape.
Actually while were at it, if I pick up some sort of tester to check Ammonia and all that other good junk what are ALL the levels to shoot for? Anyone?
Kyle
Well the good levels of nitrogen (N) compounds are:
NH4 = 0 ppm
NO2 = 0 ppm
NO3 = 10-30 ppm
If the levels are within the above mentioned range, your nitrification bacteria are OK (tank well cycled) and you have done decent amount of water changes. However, should the nitrate (NO3) level be higher than 30 ppm, you should do more water changes.

A good pH level for caribes is within the range 6.2 - 7.5. it is important, however, to have a stabile non fluctuating pH. Please do not use any pH regulators unless you are sure what you are doing and that you know the possible consequences.

Harry
 
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