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my sister is #1 best prostitute
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ok so there has been alot of sectarian violence andnow the new pres of iraq is talking to iran and syria for solutions and todays meeting with bush was postponed..

do you guys think the iraqi president is snubbing bush?

is a new iraq that is strong allies with syria and iran and in a bloody sectarian cycle ofviolence better tehn it was under the sadam regiem?

with iran moving forward with it nuke program isnt iraq more likely no to get ahold of wmd then when sadam was in power?

just when things in iraq seem to be at there lowest nice little twist and turns expose even more failures by this administration to properly exicute a plan for iraq..
 

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made me think of "it"...

wonder which contry you will invade next.


but seriously, its an explosive situation.
 

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Innes is da Man!
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damn americans
 

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well with us setting the power i doubt we will ever leave the country and we will kinda treat it as a puppet for a very long time.. and how long do new iraqi pres. last anyway?
 

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Well people are so mad about Iraq and wanting to leave but its like these other countries are like shitty soccer moms screaming from the side lines. IF they want to help, they need to volunteer to bring after game snacks!

Get the picture?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0...5003402,00.html

Bodies pile up in Baghdad
December 01, 2006 03:51am

BAGHDAD'S overflowing morgues welcomed another grim daily harvest of bullet-riddled corpses overnight as Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki met US President George W. Bush and vowed to halt the violence.

Iraqi security officials said they had recovered the bodies of 58 murder victims in Baghdad over the previous 24 hours - a US spokeswoman confirmed 49 - and that a mass grave holding 28 corpses was found north of the city.

Six civilians were killed in sectarian fighting around Baquba, north of the capital, and two police were killed by insurgents in the western city of Fallujah, police said.

These latest victims of Iraq's vicious sectarian conflict formed a gloomy backdrop to a crisis meeting in neighbouring Jordan between Mr Bush and Mr Maliki, whose embattled unity government has been undermined by the bloodshed.

Mr Bush took the opportunity to hail Mr Maliki as a strong leader, denying reports that the White House was losing confidence in him, and both leaders pledged to bring the sectarian fighting to an end.

"He's the right guy for Iraq. We're going to help him, and it is in our interest to help him, for the sake of peace. He is a strong leader and wants a free and democratic Iraq to succeed," Mr Bush told a joint news conference.

Mr Maliki said he had won an agreement from Mr Bush that he will be take control of Iraq's security forces more quickly than planned, to allow him to fight the insurgency in his own way.

Currently most of the fledgling Iraqi army comes under the day-to-day control of a US-led coalition, which also has 150,000 American troops.

"We have agreed and we were clear on the need to speed up the transfer of security responsibilities to the Iraqi forces," Mr Maliki said.

Nevertheless, Mr Bush explicitly ruled out setting a timetable for US forces to leave, a move which will anger Mr Maliki's increasingly vocal opponents.

Six ministers and 30 MPs loyal to radical Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr suspended participation in Mr Maliki's coalition yesterday to protest that the meeting with "the criminal Bush" was taking place at all.

After the Amman summit, one Sadrist deputy said the bloc - the largest in the 275-seat parliament - was reaching out to both sides of the sectarian divide to build an anti-American alliance.


"We are endeavouring to form a national front inside parliament to oppose the occupation," Salih al-Agaili said.

He said that the minimum condition for Sadrist deputies to rejoin the government would "be a timetable for the withdrawal of US forces".

On his return to Baghdad, Mr Maliki urged Sadr to reconsider the boycott.

"I wish they would revise their decision as it is not a positive milestone in the political process," he told reporters.

US forces invaded Iraq in March 2003 to overthrow dictator Saddam Hussein and subsequently oversaw elections which brought Mr Maliki to power, but have since become bogged down in a war between Iraq's Sunnis and Shiites.
 
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