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Evidently these fish don't care about spines in their diet!
I'm guessing they have no qualms about eating cichlids either?

I guess horror stories can be educational in their own way!
The bones will digest, but the chiclids will pick every fn off his bodies before he dies of stress if they're south am's .
Bes
300 gal 140gal,75gal two 55's
fish colection cosists of
2 aripimas, 2arowana's
one gymnarchus ,or aba aba
aka upsidedown knife
6 pulcher datnoids, (wide bar)
siamese tiger and looking for more ,6redtail cats

bes
 

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I'm actually not keeping that website up anymore as I've largely gotten out of fish (except for my Jardini and pair of Leopoldi Stingrays) and don't have much time anymore. But, here are the profiles if you are interested in reading them:

Australian Arowana:
Scientific Names:

Pearl Saratoga - Scleropages jardini
Spotted Saratoga - Scleropages leichardti

Place of Origin:
The Northern Pearl is found throughout northern Australia. It is the most common of the two Arowanas (it will be referred to as the Jardini from now on). The Spotted Baramundi is found in Queensland and eastern Australia.

Average Cost:
Jardinis are usually purchased as 2 to 3 inch juveniles. These sizes arrive in stores around Christmas and are available through Spring. Individuals of this size sell for about $40 to $50. As the season goes on larger specimens become available. Six inch ones can cost up to $100. I have seen the same size sell for about $170! There is no need to spend that much on one. They aren't that hard to find.

Liechardtis are significantly more expensive than Jardinis because they are much harder to find. If you do come across one in a store, you can expect to pay at least $150 for a juvenile. They can be special ordered or better yet, purchased from an on-line dealer.

Size:
Both forms of the Australian Arowana grow to about the same size. The growth rate is fastest for the first year. Being one of the slowest growers in the Arowana family, one will generally reach about 12 inches in the first year. After that, the rate will slow. Australian Arowanas can reach a length of up to 30 inches. They aren't as maneuverable as South American Arowanas and so require a tank AT LEAST as wide as the fish is long. In other words, if the fish is 30 inches long, the tank should be at least 30" wide. Juveniles can be raised in smaller tanks such as a 55 or 75 gallon but the tank must grow with the fish.

Water Requirements:
Australian Arowanas do well in water that is neutral to slightly acidic. They are more sensitive to water quality than the Silver so particular care must be taken when maintaining the tank. This is not a beginners' fish! Ammonia and nitrites must be kept at zero and the water must be very well filtered and clean. Another reason for keeping the water quality perfect is that Jardinis are particularly prone to fin rot. This condition can be avoided if the water is kept clean.

Use strong filtration such as Emperor power filters or good canisters such as an Eheim. For an adult specimen requiring a large tank, an overflow system filtered by a wet/dry is a very good choice. I recommend performing weekly water changes of at least 50%. Using a Python will make the job of changing a large volume of water A LOT easier.

Feeding Requirements:
The key to raising any Arowana is a varied diet. Individuals are usually fed feeders in stores. This is not a good diet! There is too much fat in feeder fish and the risk of disease is way too high to chance. This habit must be changed as soon as possible. A good diet to get youngsters used to is floating food sticks and frozen raw shrimp, squid, and scallops. Fish fillets like pollack and smelt are also a good choice. I use Azoo's 9 in 1 Arowana Sticks. This is a well balanced diet and will give the best growth rate and the best coloration. Adults can also be given this diet. I feed the sticks a few times a day and the meaty stuff once a day. I have heard of people feeding their adults mice and other little fuzzy things but this is not a good idea because they are mostly fur and bones. There is not enough nutrition to be worth the time and effort.

General Appearance:
Australian Arowanas are very similar in body shape to the Asian. The only difference is that the Australian has more scales on the lateral line than the Asian. As with all species of Arowana, they carry barbel-like extensions on the lower jaw. Depending on the individual, color can range from a dull green, to gold, to a purple. Leichardtis are easily distinguished by the two spots of color on each scale.

Temperament:
Australian Arowanas can be more skittish than Silvers, and that's pretty bad! They can also be much more aggressive. My Jardini is especially aggressive and must be kept by himself. Temperment varies, but in general they are all pretty nasty. Experimentation will come in handy with choosing tankmates. I highly recommend against keeping them with other Arowanas or Stingrays.

As with all Arowanas the tank must be tightly covered because a startled fish is likely to try and make the "big leap." The will to jump is part of their natural instinct. It can't be stopped completely, but it can be maintained with a little precaution.

Here's a shot of my Jardini at 19"
Black Arowana:
Scientific Name:

Osteoglossum ferreirai

Place of Origin:
The Rio Branco, a tributary of the Rio ***** in Brazil

Average Cost:
Black Arowanas are getting increasingly harder to find. Normally, the season for youngsters is Spring. If you would like to purchase one I suggest reserving the smallest size for when they arrive at a trusted fish store only. Become familiar with the shop owner. If you can't reserve one then find out what day the store receives its fish shipment and go back every week till they arrive. This fish is very easy to miss if you aren't looking carefully. Youngsters around an inch will cost about $30 while the price jumps up to around $100 for one at four inches.

Size:
Black Arowanas max out at around 30 inches. For the first year, expect the fish to grow about 1 inch per month, then the rate will slow down. Juveniles can be raised in smaller tanks such as a 55 gallon, but an adult must be given it's space. A tank at least as wide as the fish is long is recommended.

Water Requirements:
Black Arowanas do great in water that is on the soft side and is slightly acidic to neutral. Warning: this is not a beginners' fish! They are more susceptible to ammonia and nitrites than Silvers so the water must be kept immaculately clean. Good filtration and maintenance is a must.

I perform weekly water changes of 50% to 75%. If your tap water is close to your tank's water as far as pH goes, then changing such a large volume of water shouldn't be a problem. Consider buying a Python to make water changes 1000 times better. No more buckets!

Feeding Requirements:
Just like all other Arowanas, Blacks should be fed a varied diet. Don't get them hooked on just one thing. When most specimens are purchased at the store they are probably used to eating live food. This is all right as a treat but it is not a good diet to use all the time. There is an extreme risk of disease in using feeder goldfish and they are also high in fat and contain an enzyme that inhibits the production of thiamin. Instead of using live food, try frozen raw shrimp, squid, and scallops, and fish fillets. Another good basic diet, if you can get your baby to eat it, is floating food sticks. These must be introduced at a very young age to get an Arowana trained to accept them.

Make sure you know what an Arowana is eating before you bring it home from the store. If it was on a diet of primarily live food, you may have your work cut out for you to train it to accept something else. With young Blacks, it is often best to grow them out a bit and get them established before attemping to starve them into eating other foods. To prevent having to go through the "tough love" process, it's wise to purchase one that was eating a varied diet while at the store. It will make your life and the life of your Arowana much easier.

General Appearance:
A Black Arowana goes through a drastic change in appearance as it matures. It starts out black with yellowish white stripes running horizontally down the body. This makes the fish look like a penguin. At about 6 inches the black markings will begin to fade. The orange stripes will migrate to the ends of the dorsal and anal fins. Some fish will take on a bluish hue to the body and fins, while others turn a dull silverish gray. The latter color ends up looking very much like a Silver Arowana.

Temperament:
As with all Arowanas, Blacks can be very easy to freak out. They are jumpers and will take flight if given the chance. The tank must be adequately covered in order to prevent this from happening. The Black Arowana is not an outright aggressive fish. It will not bully its tankmates like some other large fish do. It will, on the other hand, eat anything that is small enough to fit into its mouth. Tankmates must be chosen accordingly. I keep my Black with Stingrays, a pair of Severums, some Silver Dollars, and other larger growing semi-aggressive fish.

Breeding:
Breeding is very similar to that of the Silver Arowana. It is possible if the tank is big enough. A pair is most easily obtained by raising a group of juveniles together. After mating, the eggs are carried in the parents' mouths till about 30 days after hatching.
Silver Arowana:
Scientific Name:

Osteoglossum bicirrhosum

Place of Origin:
Amazon River basin and Guyana

Average Cost:
Silvers are the most popular of the Arowanas and so it is also the cheapest. Don't let that fact change the perception of this fish's extreme beauty. A 1 inch juvenile demands a price of about $15. Foot long individuals go for around $80. Never purchase a youngster that still carries its egg sac. This baby is too young and chances are it will not make it in the hands of even an above average aquarist.

Size:
Silvers can grow at a rate of up to 2 inches per month for the first year and can eventually reach a staggering length of over 3 feet when full grown. Juveniles can be raised in smaller tanks, but the tank must grow with the fish. The tank should be at least as wide as the fish is long to ensure proper growth. Obviously length is also a factor. For a 12" youngster, a tank of at least 48" in length should be the minimum, for an adult 72".

Water Requirements:
Silver Arowanas need the best of water conditions to ensure the best coloration and finnage. This is not a beginners' fish! Ammonia and nitrites must be kept at zero, and the water must be clean and clear. Good filtration is very important, especially with fish like Arowanas that produce a lot of waste. Frequent water changes are also a must. I do a 50% to 75% water change twice a week, though this amount depends largely on your tap water type.

Feeding Requirements:
A varied diet is crucial in raising any Arowana. Getting a youngster to eat anything BUT guppies is a very smart idea. All my babies that I've purchased in the past were fed guppies in the store. It was quite a chore switching them over to non-live food, but it was worth the work. Feeder goldfish are notorious carriers of disease unless they are homegrown. They are also high in fat and carry an enzyme which inhibits the production of thiamin. Please don't subject your Arowana to this risk. A treat is one thing, but using them as a regular diet could be compared to a person living on a diet of candy bars. As a great substitute for live food consider using frozen raw shimp, squid, scallops, and fish fillets. Getting a juvenile trained to accept floating sticks is also a good idea. I recommend Azoo's 9 in 1 Arowana Sticks. These sticks contain complete nutrition and produce excellent coloration in the fish.

General Appearance:
Even though Silver Arowanas are the cheapest and therefore the most common of all the Arowanas, that doesn't mean that they aren't beautiful. This fish is adorable as a little baby and grows into a stunning adult. The Silver is more elongated and has longer fins than its Asian and Australian brothers. As with all Arowanas, it has barbel-like extensions protruding from the mouth. The body can range in color from a flat silver to a rich kaleidoscope of blues, reds, and pinks. The fins can carry the same variations in color as the body but can also display striping to the point where they resemble tiger markings, which is most apparent on juveniles. If raised properly, this fish can break beyond the boundaries of being just a "plain old Silver" and become a top quality fish that demands just as much attention as their Asian counterparts.

A very common malady that is striking more and more Silver Arowanas kept in captivity today is drop eye, a condition where the eyes constantly look down. It can be brought on by a fatty diet which will create deposits of fat behind the eyes. However, it is said that the more common cause is the fact that they are now being primarily farm raised. This creates a shallower gene pool than what is found in the wild, and can lead to a genetic predisposition to the condition. Unfortunately, almost all Silvers kept in tanks will get it in at least one eye. There are several fabled remedies for the situation such as floating ping pong balls, but when I tried them, it only succeeded in startling the fish and worrying me about the potential swallow factor. The condition doesn't seem to hinder the fish in the least so it's usually something that we end up having to live with. The only way to prevent it is to keep the fish in a pond.

Temperament:
Silver Arowanas are known to be quite "freaky" as far as fish go. They get scared very easily. In the wild this fish survives by jumping for its food (insects and birds) and because of this habit tanks must be kept covered at all times and even weighted down as the fish grows. If something spooks the fish it will also jump. I think every Arowana owner knows what it's like to see their baby flopping around on the floor. Every one of my Silvers has been on the floor at least once. As long as the fish isn't there long, it should be fine.

Aside from being notorious jumpers that spook easily, Silvers don't have much else as a downside. They pretty much keep to themselves and aren't very aggressive towards other fish as long as the other fish aren't considered food. They are aggressive to each other however, and I highly recommend keeping all Arowana singly if you want flawless finnage. If you must keep more than one Arowana in the same tank, a group of several is highly recommended, though most aquarists would not be able to provide an adequately sized tank for such a numer. If the group is kept small, there will always be bullying and fin damage...sometimes worse.

Breeding:
Silvers aren't that hard to breed, provided the tank is big enough and you have a pair. A pair is obtained by raising a group together. If you live in a warm location successful breeding will be more easily accomplished in an outdoor pond. Breeders should be at least 4 years old to get the best results. Arowanas are mouth brooders, meaning the eggs are hatched in the parents' mouths. The growing fry will also be raised in this location till they are about 42 days old.
 

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i have a 2 foot silver that is starting to eat everything in his tank he just ate my two tiger shovel nose cats one was 18 inches he did not eat this one he broke its tail off and the other one was 12 inches and he ate him when i was ate work when i came home from work all i seen was the tsn's head on the bottom of the tank
what!? no way ur aro can eat ur 12"tsn better yet leave the head.
its ur 18" tsn that did it man.
 

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I have kept arowanas, south american, australian and asian for years. Have had piranhas on and off, now i am again in a piranha phase, but let me tell you, nothing beats an aro!!!
 

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Arowanas tend to merge in groups of 5 to 8; any fewer may show an excess of dominance and aggression. Keep this fish in a minimum of about 750 litres (200 gal.) with good filtration. This fish should not be purchased by an amateur fish hobbyist. Some compatible fish to partner with this fish are clown knifefish, pacu, oscars, plecostomus, jaguar cichlids, green terrors, gar and any other semi-aggressive fish that cannot fit in the arowana's mouth.
They are excellent jumpers; it has been reported that Osteoglossum species have been seen leaping more than 6 feet (almost 2 metres) from the water surface to pick off insects and birds from overhanging branches in South America, hence the nickname "water monkeys". Arowanas have been rumored to capture prey as large as low flying bats and small birds. All species are large, and the arapaima is a contender for the world's largest freshwater fish title. Arowana typically grow around 3 to 4 feet, but this is only accountable in captivity.

Several species of osteoglossid exhibit extensive parental care. They build nests and protect the young after they hatch. Some species are mouth brooders, the parents holding sometimes hundreds of eggs in their mouths. The young may make several tentative trips outside the parent's mouth to investigate the surroundings before leaving permanently.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arowana

ASIAN AROWANAS ARE ENDANGERED! THEY ARE ILLEGAL IN THE USA!
 

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