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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm asking all P owners regardless of what state or country you are in to write, email or call Senator Charlie Ringo (503) 986-1717 or email: [email protected]

WRITE:
Senator Charlie Ringo (D-17)
Capitol Phone: 503-986-1717
Address: 900 Court St. NE, S-314
Salem, OR 97301

It seems this Senator is chair of the committee that has the SB 125 on his desk. He also (get ready to laugh) has a tankful of piranas in his office! So we have a potential ally in that office to keep the Senate Bill from being reviewed by the Senate.

Your SUBJECT line should be: Senate Bill 125 - Prohibiting Piranhas

Your SALUTATION should be: Dear Honorable Senator Ringo:

The BODY of text should be in your own words why piranhas should not be prohibited and why they are important to you as a hobbyist. Key things to mention is how educational they are and what you've learned from the fish.

My wish is to show Senator Ringo and all others that pirana ownership is not limited to just Oregon, but throughout the world. Those of you that own them in states where they are illegal, its up to you to decide whether to write or not to call or write. You of all people are probably more emotional than those in "legal" states and can best tell the Senator how having them illegal has impacted your life.

Also, I was told by one of my contacts in the Senate bldg that he called ODFW a couple years ago to find out if piranas were illegal and he was told by an ODFW officer that "only a sicko would keep that fish". So now you can see what ODFW thinks of you the hobbyist.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Below is my email to Sen. Ringo:

Dear Honorable Senator Ringo:

My name is Frank Magallanes. I co-authored the Oregon revised statute ORS 498.242 with Senator Bill Fisher that allowed possession of piranhas and caribes in Oregon, 1995. I also went into the District Court in 1993 and Judge William Lasswell made a legal opinion (State of Oregon v. Magallanes, Case No. 93-CR-0124VI):
The phrase "commonly known as" in ORS 498.242(1)(b) is meant to identify only fish that would be identified as piranha or caribe by people knowledgeable about fish, when those people were asked to differentiate piranha or caribe from other kinds of fish.

The pirambeba in this case are differentiated from piranha or caribe by people knowledgeable about fish by their characteristic of not being dangerous to man.
It is my understanding that ODFW is attempting to revisit the statute to prohibit piranhas/caribes again and allow possession of vegetarian serrasalmin's in the genera; Colossoma, Metynnis, and Myleus. What ODFW does not seem to be aware of or is ignorant of the genus Colossoma ( includes genus Piaractus) also known locally as pacu, tambaqui or piratinga is the species often mistakenly identified as piranha throughout the United States when such captures occur. This link will take you the official USGS report on the release of pacu in the United States compiled by a government agency, it has been removed as an online reference but you can access the cache information: http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:kQuTu...ort+pacu+&hl=en .

The intent of this email is to plead with you not to allow Senate Bill 125 become a revision of law. With the exception of (1) one occurrence of an allegedly released piranha (= Pygocentrus nattereri; August 14, 2003 MILWAUKIE Boy catches piranha in Portland-area creek), ODFW acknowledged that fish would not have lived past the winter in that newspaper article in the Oregonian.

I know that it is wrong for anyone to release unwanted pet fish. I have so stated in the House Natural Resources (circa 1995), that it was very likely there might be some people that would release a piranha into our local waters. I also stated then at that meeting in 1995 and later upheld by The American Fisheries Society, TRANSACTIONS of the American Fisheries Society. Volume 126:84-849, dated September 1997, the species Pygocentrus nattereri would not live or reproduce in our cold Oregon waters.

If there is any questions I might be able to answer for you. Please contact me at home at: (541) 440-6548 or this email address: [email protected] or write to: Frank Magallanes, 672 SE Parrott Street, Roseburg, Oregon 97470.

Lastly, I find it sad that our fish and wildlife agency continues to refer to pacus as vegetarian piranhas. That is an egregious mistake. Though the species of pacus are in the subfamily Serrasalminae, genetically they are not even close to the genera that pertains to piranhas or their associated forms. Nor are pacus referred to as piranhas or caribes in their native land.

Sincerely yours,

Frank Magallanes
http://www.opefe.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
PacmanXSA Posted Today, 03:57 PM
I would probably come up with something, alas, I am not American... Or does it matter?

Pac
If you own piranhas then write or call. Doesn't matter what country you are from. The intent is to let THEM KNOW you are a hobbyist that cares about piranhas and keeping them responsibly.
 

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ok here was my msg...short and sweet, but to the point...

Dear Honorable Senator Ringo:

I am a hobbiest that collects rare species of piranhas. One of my fellow hobbiest has pointed out to me that piranhas coudl soon become illeagle everywhere, and i was given your contact in responce to the issue.

To start off, I'm not even from your state, I'm from PA, another state which they are legal. I've been in the hobby only a few months now, but I've learned an incredible amount not jsut about the fish I have, but about all of nature in general. Piranhas are really no different than dogs or cats when it comes to keeping them as pets. They need love and attention just like "man's best friend." Yet at the same time, a pet dog can be just as dangerous as my fish are thought to be.

All that I'm asking is that you keep piranhas legal, and maybe, if you're as serious as many of the people in my hobby are, you will help to legalize this incredible specimen in more of our states.

Thank you very much for your time,
Joseph W. Pearce
 

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i already got a responce to my email.....here it is!

Mr. Pearce:

I do not expect that SB 125 will pass committee. I had the pleasure of
working in a campaign office that hosted a beautiful pair of piranha.
In my limited research, I noted that most species of piranha require a
water temperature of at least mid-70 degrees fahrenheit to survive, much
less reproduce.

I have suggested to Senator Ringo that the Oregon Department of Fish and
Wildlife's fears that piranha may invade our ecosystem is unfounded, as
our excessively cold glacial waters would likely take care of any
attempted piranha incursion.

-Mike Selvaggio
Office of Senator Ringo
Oregon State Senate
 

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Dear Honorable Senator Ringo:

My name is James Bradd and I am an 18 year old college student born and raised in Salem, OR, our states' beautiful capital. I am studying political science as a pre-law student, so I in no way declare myself as a scientist, though my words do have scientific backing. I feel it is best for you to hear such information from a scientist however, so my purpose in writing this e-mail is to impress upon you my personal feelings as to the problems and undue economic stress this legislation will create. Oregon is well known for its natural beauty, in fact that is part of the reason I decided to go to college in this great state and start my family here. It is with great respect that I request your support for killing this bill in comitee. The ODFW is unfounded and unreasonable in revisiting this bill. There is no academic substantiation to the claim a piranha population could form and sustain itself in ANY oregon water, especially as a result the occasional misfit releasing this beautiful creature into unwelcome waters. Just yesterday I had to wait 30 minutes for my car to thaw out, I find it hard to believe our climate is sutable for a population of Amazonian fish.
In addition to the rediculous nature of the ODFW's request I am concerned about the logistics of enforcing such a law. I don't need to tell you that our state is already strapped for cash. Furthermore this bill would be detrimental to our states fight against invasive species. One species in particular is the Zebra Mussel, which the USDF estimates will cause around $50 billion in economic damages to the Great Lakes region alone. I feel that any money spent on keeping piranha's out of citizens homes instead of stopping the threat of Zebra Mussels is a rediculous waste of taxpayer money. We all know the intense fight for water going on in the Kalamath basin, why not prevent a potentially greater problem in the Columbia River Basin?
Another possible effect of this legislation is that if the law goes unenforced due to lack of funds, innocent local fish store owners will lose business in vain. Piranha are a popular fish and also somewhat expensive. Many store owners carry these fish and sell them effectively. It would be harmful to our already damaged economy to remove a harmless product from a small businesses store over false pretenses. In addition to the fish itself, the products used to support a piranha in captivity are a boost to the economy. I wont give you an estimate of costs but piranha require a large tank with excellent filtration. For every fish sold, an aquarium, plants, lights, filters and other items are sold as well. I feel if not for science, then for bussiness we must stand up and oppose this legislation.
Another important aspect I feel is being overlooked is the educational importance of keeping piranha in captivity. When I was in the 5th grade my teacher set up aquariums for us. We raised guppies to learn about aquatic systems and different climates. Since then I have been in love with fish keeping. As I approached my current age I saw a video on the Amazon River Basin and was turned on to the notion of keeping piranha for myself. It was this experience that helped keep my attention towards school. I feel many children will be excited by studying animals such as the piranha and there is no experience like seeing one up close in person. It is in the best interest of our state to give children any boost we can to encourage learning.
I would like to thank you for your time and let you know how much I appreciate you reading this e-mail. I am proud to take part in our states legislative proccess and hope to hear from you in the future.

-James Michael Bradd
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
piranhasrule Posted Today, 04:43 AM
iv sent him an email, it probably didnt do any god though because i went on about aload of stuff that even i didnt understand
The important thing here is, you wrote him.


jamesdelanoche Posted Today, 01:51 AM
I'll let you know when I hear back.
jamesdelanoche Posted Today, 01:50 AM
Dear Honorable Senator Ringo:

My name is James Bradd and I am an 18 year old college student born and raised in Salem, OR, our states' beautiful capital. I am studying political science as a pre-law student, so I in no way declare myself as a scientist, though my words do have scientific backing. I feel it is best for you to hear such information from a scientist however, so my purpose in writing this e-mail is to impress upon you my personal feelings as to the problems and undue economic stress this legislation will create. Oregon is well known for its natural beauty, in fact that is part of the reason I decided to go to college in this great state and start my family here. It is with great respect that I request your support for killing this bill in comitee. The ODFW is unfounded and unreasonable in revisiting this bill. There is no academic substantiation to the claim a piranha population could form and sustain itself in ANY oregon water, especially as a result the occasional misfit releasing this beautiful creature into unwelcome waters. Just yesterday I had to wait 30 minutes for my car to thaw out, I find it hard to believe our climate is sutable for a population of Amazonian fish.
In addition to the rediculous nature of the ODFW's request I am concerned about the logistics of enforcing such a law. I don't need to tell you that our state is already strapped for cash. Furthermore this bill would be detrimental to our states fight against invasive species. One species in particular is the Zebra Mussel, which the USDF estimates will cause around $50 billion in economic damages to the Great Lakes region alone. I feel that any money spent on keeping piranha's out of citizens homes instead of stopping the threat of Zebra Mussels is a rediculous waste of taxpayer money. We all know the intense fight for water going on in the Kalamath basin, why not prevent a potentially greater problem in the Columbia River Basin?
Another possible effect of this legislation is that if the law goes unenforced due to lack of funds, innocent local fish store owners will lose business in vain. Piranha are a popular fish and also somewhat expensive. Many store owners carry these fish and sell them effectively. It would be harmful to our already damaged economy to remove a harmless product from a small businesses store over false pretenses. In addition to the fish itself, the products used to support a piranha in captivity are a boost to the economy. I wont give you an estimate of costs but piranha require a large tank with excellent filtration. For every fish sold, an aquarium, plants, lights, filters and other items are sold as well. I feel if not for science, then for bussiness we must stand up and oppose this legislation.
Another important aspect I feel is being overlooked is the educational importance of keeping piranha in captivity. When I was in the 5th grade my teacher set up aquariums for us. We raised guppies to learn about aquatic systems and different climates. Since then I have been in love with fish keeping. As I approached my current age I saw a video on the Amazon River Basin and was turned on to the notion of keeping piranha for myself. It was this experience that helped keep my attention towards school. I feel many children will be excited by studying animals such as the piranha and there is no experience like seeing one up close in person. It is in the best interest of our state to give children any boost we can to encourage learning.
I would like to thank you for your time and let you know how much I appreciate you reading this e-mail. I am proud to take part in our states legislative proccess and hope to hear from you in the future.

-James Michael Bradd
Fantastic email and good argument.
ODFW held a big meeting across the state to poison Diamond Lake resort because of a Tui Chub problem. ODFW blames fishermen for introducing the fish as bait fish. This is the 3rd or 4th time they've used poison. In one meeting in 1996, Forestry Service admitted to accidently introducing the chub into the lake. ODFW man shut the representative up. Its easier to blame fishermen than it is to admit ANOTHER STOCKING MISTAKE by a government agency! DL is a lake stocked with trout. The general public didn't want rotenone used because this chemical kills everything in the water including species that are considered threatened or endangered elsewhere. In the end, ODFW got their way and are proceeding ahead with the rotenone. They hold public meetings and then go their own way. To much power in one agency!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
At least you got a reply. I sent mine out before any of you and no reply. So we'll wait for others and see if they get the same replies.

Still there is hope in that 1 reply:

Mr. Pearce:

I do not expect that SB 125 will pass committee. I had the pleasure of
working in a campaign office that hosted a beautiful pair of piranha.
In my limited research, I noted that most species of piranha require a
water temperature of at least mid-70 degrees fahrenheit to survive, much
less reproduce.

I have suggested to Senator Ringo that the Oregon Department of Fish and
Wildlife's fears that piranha may invade our ecosystem is unfounded, as
our excessively cold glacial waters would likely take care of any
attempted piranha incursion.

-Mike Selvaggio
Office of Senator
 

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We butt heads sometimes about stuff but I want you to know that in something like this you have my full support.

Dear Senator Ringo:

I heard from my friend Frank Magallanes that the State of Oregon is considering making it against state ordinance to own Piranha's as pets. I live in Wisconsin which is a Piranha legal state however I wanted to express my concern, and offer my support. As I'm sure Frank has made you aware these species are not all that dangerous to keep as pets. People that live in areas where Piranha's are native swim with them in the rivers. It seems like a crazy thing to do given the media and movies distorted image of the way Piranha's act in nature. I know that sometimes it makes the news that piranha's are found in streams or rivers in the northern states because most people view piranha's as very dangerous, however it's almost always confirmed to be Pacu. Pacu's are not genetically alike to Piranha's as I'm sure Frank Magallanes has made you aware. He is very knowledgeable about Piranha's and I'm sure he can give you information that will show you it's not invasive to the Oregon's Ecosystem. Piranha's could barely survive summer water temperatures let alone breed as they are used to living with a water temperature of 70+ Degrees. Please understand these are our pets and we care for them. Across the USA we work together with other Hobbyists to learn about the fish, help people just getting into the hobby with questions, and encourage that the fish are given to other hobbyists and never released. I have learned so much about the Biotope of the Rivers of South America through this Hobby and hope to continue to do so for years to come. Please do anything you can to help us.

Thank you for taking the time to read this,

David Charland
1901 Ridgeway Dr #35
De Pere, WI 54115
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
KrazyCrusader Posted Today, 10:57 AM
We butt heads sometimes about stuff but I want you to know that in something like this you have my full support.

Dear Senator Ringo:

I heard from my friend Frank Magallanes that the State of Oregon is considering making it against state ordinance to own Piranha's as pets. I live in Wisconsin which is a Piranha legal state however I wanted to express my concern, and offer my support. As I'm sure Frank has made you aware these species are not all that dangerous to keep as pets. People that live in areas where Piranha's are native swim with them in the rivers. It seems like a crazy thing to do given the media and movies distorted image of the way Piranha's act in nature. I know that sometimes it makes the news that piranha's are found in streams or rivers in the northern states because most people view piranha's as very dangerous, however it's almost always confirmed to be Pacu. Pacu's are not genetically alike to Piranha's as I'm sure Frank Magallanes has made you aware. He is very knowledgeable about Piranha's and I'm sure he can give you information that will show you it's not invasive to the Oregon's Ecosystem. Piranha's could barely survive summer water temperatures let alone breed as they are used to living with a water temperature of 70+ Degrees. Please understand these are our pets and we care for them. Across the USA we work together with other Hobbyists to learn about the fish, help people just getting into the hobby with questions, and encourage that the fish are given to other hobbyists and never released. I have learned so much about the Biotope of the Rivers of South America through this Hobby and hope to continue to do so for years to come. Please do anything you can to help us.

Thank you for taking the time to read this,

David Charland
1901 Ridgeway Dr #35
De Pere, WI 54115
Well written email and informative. As for the remark in bold, I'll only say this; I'm only concerned that YOU THE HOBBYIST get factual information not thoughts on factual information from outside P-FURY.


Thank you from all of us in Oregon for your support.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
An internet search reveals this bit of information:

:: Deadliest Creatures On earth :: Ruthless Killers The Piranha
@ news Jan 01 2005, 22:12 (UTC+0)

Photo By: Unknown -- Piranha

nih writes: --

From the moment tiny baby piranhas hatch from their microscopic eggs, they come into the world armed and dangerous. Baby piranha will feast on tiny crustaceans, fruits, seeds, and aquatic plants. Once they reach about 1.5 inches in length they begin feeding on the fins and flesh of other fish that wander too closely.

As they grow larger they begin to venture out in groups (schools) of about 20 fish where they use a variety of hunting strategies to kill and eat their prey. Heck, they don't kill their prey first, they just start eating the victim alive - that's what makes them so ferocious. Adult piranha have been known to eat their own babies. Talk about brutal

When a school of piranha are in a feeding frenzy the water appears to boil and churn red with blood. They attack with such ferocity that they strip an animal of its flesh within a matter of minutes, even taking bites out of each other in the process.

Adult piranha will eat just about anything - other fish, sick and weakened cattle, even parts of people. Sickly cattle that have stooped their heads down to drink from the river have been grabbed by the mouth and nose and pulled into the water, completely devoured minutes later. As wicked as it all sounds, piranha have a useful function in the Amazonian jungles just like any other predators in the wild. They are part of the checks and balances Mother Nature employs to eliminate the weak and sick so only the strong survive.

Piranhas are world-famous for their razor-sharp teeth. Native peoples of South America will catch the piranha and use their teeth to make tools and weapons. Even the fisherman who catch these vicious little predators have to be careful when the fish is out of water. A single piranha out of water is still dangerous enough to take off the flesh, or the odd toe, from an unwary fisherman.

Predator Becomes Prey

As ferocious and fearsome as the piranhas are, they are not invulnerable. As young the piranhas are a tasty part of many other creatures' diet. As voracious adults the piranha feed on young herons that fall from the trees while learning to fly, or young caimans (a type of small alligator) that are too little to defend themselves. When the floodplains of the Amazon run dry during the dry season the piranha are stranded in isolated lagoons, where they languish and die from lack of oxygen. The adult herons will then feed on the piranha that once ate their young. Caimans will feast on the piranhas that ate their young kin, as they lay dying in their shrinking pools. Such is the circle of life.

Pet Piranhas?

Believe it or not, there are people who actually keep piranhas as "pets". Piranhas aren't good pets in the traditional sense because you can't hold or pet them, and they aren't affectionate. Piranha owners still must be extremely careful of the fish's sharp teeth and aggressive nature. Keeping them well fed is probably the key to keeping them mellow.

People who fancy piranhas as pets may be more attracted to the grisly reputation and aggressive manner of these world-class predators, perhaps keeping them for their "entertainment" value. That's O.K. - it's human nature to be fascinated with morbid and gruesome creatures. But piranhas are also very beautiful fish. As long as anyone desires to take a creature out of the wild and bring into captivity they must take the responsibility of treating it with respect and good care.

http://www.extremescience.com

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

© juice.box.sk / http://juice.box.sk

:: Deadliest Creatures On earth ::...
Published in Box.sk - Indexed on Jan 4, 2005 Relevance:
nih writes: -- From the moment tiny baby piranhas hatch from their microscopic eggs, they come into the world armed and dangerous. Baby piranha will feast on tiny crustaceans, fruits, seeds, and aquatic plants. Once they reach about 1.5 inches in length they begin feeding on the fins and flesh of other fish that wander too closely. As they grow larger they begin to venture out in groups (schools) of about 20 fish where they use a variety of hunting strategies to kill and eat their prey. Heck, they don't kill their prey first, they just start eating the victim alive - that's what makes them so ferocious.


Box.sk News Story
Published in Box.sk - Indexed on Jan 4, 2005 Relevance:
@ news Jan 01 2005, 22:12 (UTC+0) Photo By: Unknown -- Piranha nih writes: -- From the moment tiny baby piranhas hatch from their microscopic eggs, they come into the world armed and dangerous. Baby piranha will feast on tiny crustaceans, fruits, seeds, and aquatic plants. Once they reach about 1.5 inches in length they begin feeding on the fins and flesh of other fish that wander too closely. As they grow larger they begin to venture out in groups (schools) of about 20 fish where they use a variety of hunting strategies to kill and eat their prey.


====================
Tue: 21:35- Piranha without a Permit - Numerous
fishermen around the Midwest found piranhas on their
fishing lines last summer. The fish are almost
certainly from home aquariums, and they should not be
in open lakes and stream.


Wed: 18:35- Regional Connection - A nine-state plan
for the Midwest could restore fast passenger rail
across 3,000 miles of track.

Thu: 23:55- Gut Decision - What you eat can have a big
impact on the environment.

Fri: 18:35- Testing the Waters - People are testing
the water at public beaches more often these days, and
they are finding more contamination there than they
expected.

Info: Show scripts and other information are available
via their web site:
http://www.seagrant.wisc.edu/earthwatch/

E-mail contact: [email protected]
========================
 
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