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How to quarantine feeders? How long should the feeders be quarantine? How to notice if they have sickness?
 

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Hello Everybody!
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Ideally, you should have at least 2 - 10 gallon tanks to quarantine feeders if you decide to feed mostly live feeders to your fish. One tank that's already quarantined and ready to feed, the other in the quarantine process. The tanks should be heavily aerated with a cheap sponge filter and a heater set at about 78 degrees to speed up the parasite life cycle (if they do have it). Quarantine should be carried out for at least a one week period.

When I do use feeders, I will usually treat them anyways regardless if they seem sick or not because I don't want to risk it. I treat them with either Nox-Ich or Quick Cure (which is a broad spectrum parasiticide that has a cocktail of formalin and malachite green) according to the directions on the bottle. I also feed them a good quality flake food to get them fat and healthy... it's like "gut-loading" them before I actually feed them to my fish. This will minimize most parasites, but does very little for any type of internal parasites/nematodes that they may carry. That's why it's always a risk when you decide to give your fish live feeders.

As for how you can tell if the feeders you buy are sick, just look for symptoms like clamped fins, rapid/labored breathing, spots on the body, frayed fins, laying on the ground, or swimming at the surface with their heads pointing upward. If you see that in their feeder tanks... buy them somewhere else.
 

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~ATLANTA BRAVES~
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DonH said:
Ideally, you should have at least 2 - 10 gallon tanks to quarantine feeders if you decide to feed mostly live feeders to your fish. One tank that's already quarantined and ready to feed, the other in the quarantine process. The tanks should be heavily aerated with a cheap sponge filter and a heater set at about 78 degrees to speed up the parasite life cycle (if they do have it). Quarantine should be carried out for at least a one week period.

When I do use feeders, I will usually treat them anyways regardless if they seem sick or not because I don't want to risk it. I treat them with either Nox-Ich or Quick Cure (which is a broad spectrum parasiticide that has a cocktail of formalin and malachite green) according to the directions on the bottle. I also feed them a good quality flake food to get them fat and healthy... it's like "gut-loading" them before I actually feed them to my fish. This will minimize most parasites, but does very little for any type of internal parasites/nematodes that they may carry. That's why it's always a risk when you decide to give your fish live feeders.

As for how you can tell if the feeders you buy are sick, just look for symptoms like clamped fins, rapid/labored breathing, spots on the body, frayed fins, laying on the ground, or swimming at the surface with their heads pointing upward. If you see that in their feeder tanks... buy them somewhere else.
i agree
 

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i also find that if any fish start to swim using half their body instead of just their tail that they will die soon(not immediately but a day or so). i dont know what that is called.
 

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Ideally, you should have at least 2 - 10 gallon tanks to quarantine feeders if you decide to feed mostly live feeders to your fish. One tank that's already quarantined and ready to feed, the other in the quarantine process. The tanks should be heavily aerated with a cheap sponge filter and a heater set at about 78 degrees to speed up the parasite life cycle (if they do have it). Quarantine should be carried out for at least a one week period.

When I do use feeders, I will usually treat them anyways regardless if they seem sick or not because I don't want to risk it. I treat them with either Nox-Ich or Quick Cure (which is a broad spectrum parasiticide that has a cocktail of formalin and malachite green) according to the directions on the bottle. I also feed them a good quality flake food to get them fat and healthy... it's like "gut-loading" them before I actually feed them to my fish. This will minimize most parasites, but does very little for any type of internal parasites/nematodes that they may carry. That's why it's always a risk when you decide to give your fish live feeders.

As for how you can tell if the feeders you buy are sick, just look for symptoms like clamped fins, rapid/labored breathing, spots on the body, frayed fins, laying on the ground, or swimming at the surface with their heads pointing upward. If you see that in their feeder tanks... buy them somewhere else.
Its kind of hard finding a feeder tank without sick fish
 
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