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Mettle's fish

Common name: Dwarf Puffer
Scientific name: Tetraodon travancoricus
Synonyms: Malabar Puffer, Pygmy Puffer, or Bumblebee Puffer
Size: Up to 1".
Origin: Freshwaters of India/

Tank setup: At least a 5g tank is required for one specimen, with a rock or plenty of snails to help keep the puffer's beak trimmed. For more than one puffer you can keep a 10g with 5 or 6 specimens.

Compatibility: Fairly peaceful with similar sized fish. Long finned Fi

Temperature: 25-30oC (77-86oF)
Water chemistry: Fairly hard, neutral to alkaline (pH 7.0-8.5). Brackish water.

Feeding: Picky eaters, should be fed crustacean foods such as brine shrimp, krill, mollusks, and earthworms. Some owners do manage to get their fish on pellets and flakes though.

Sexing: Male is leaner, also dark black stripe from tail to fin. Females have a more rounder or "roly-poly" appearance.

The Dwarf Puffer is a common and easy to house puffer. Although found in brackish waters there are reports of these puffer do very well in pure freshwater. If no snails or rock are in the tank for the puffer to trim its beak, you must buy some Clover Oil and a pair of Cuticle Clippers. Put the puffer in a small dish and add a drop or two of clover oil (any more could severely hurt the fish). Once the puffer is tranquilized quickly clip the beak and you're done. Puffers are known to eat plants so its best to keep fake plastic plants in the tank. Also avoid keeping long flowing finned fish like Bettas in the tank with the puffer. The puffer family is notorious for nipping or eating the fins of other fish.

I plan on getting about 6 in a month or so.
 

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i think i saw one that look like those in salty tanks. i maybe wrong but they look alike somehow. do these fish have salt water versions?
 

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cool profile. But a dwarf puffer doesn't need his beak trimmed. i think it is the only species that doesn't, not sure why, maybe cause of the size. and 5 or 6 puffers in a ten gallon is a bad idea. because of their aggression they need about 3 gallons each. also they are pure fresh water. no brackish.
 

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C.D. said:
cool profile. But a dwarf puffer doesn't need his beak trimmed. i think it is the only species that doesn't, not sure why, maybe cause of the size. and 5 or 6 puffers in a ten gallon is a bad idea. because of their aggression they need about 3 gallons each. also they are pure fresh water. no brackish.
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Yup and the the scientific name is Carinotetraodon travancoricus, they are not peaceful and will attack fish larger then themselves and will shred all fins, and puffers do not eat plants but they will put holes in the leaves while hunting for snails. This puffer is too small to tranquilize for beak trimming, the clove oil will euthanize the fish and CD is correct there is no danger of beak overgrowth in the dwarf.
 

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well if you want my 2 cents.......... these puffers are in no way shape or form brackish. Period. This is a common mistake with most puffers. These puffers never naturally inhabit brackish waters. They can tolerate very very small amounts of salt for short periods of time but a FAR better in in freshwater. And another common question is "how many per gallon?" they are best kept with 5 gallons per 1 puffer. (ie a 20 gallon tank could house 4 puffers). And yes their teeth must be trimmed.
 
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