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Scientific name: Condylactis Passiflora
Common name: Condy Anemone, Pink/Purple Tipped Condy, Haitian Anemone, Atlantic Anemone
Family: Actiniidae
Size: Central column can reach 4" diameter. Tentacle lengths may vary.
Origin: Caribbean (atlantic)
Minimum Tank Size: Tank size is debatable. The condy's tentacles can become extremely long. So, careful precautions should be taken into tankmates and size. On average, a bare minimum of 12g is suggested.
Tank setup: Live rock. Sand is optional.
Temperament: Semi-Aggressive. It will eat tank mates if given the chance. Consideration should also be given in regards to co-habitating corals and other cnidarians.
Compatibility: Anemones of different species should not be mixed in small tanks. In larger tanks they may co-exist, but should be monitored. Corals may get stung and killed if they're in the path of an anemone.
Water Type: Saltwater. SG: 1.023-1.025
Temperature: 72-78°F
Hardness: dH
pH: 8.1-8.4
Sexual dimorphism: Anemones are not sexually dimorphic.
Breeding: Anemones reproduce asexually. Given a proper environment, it will "split." Where a clone of itself will be made by division. Anemones have been known to multiply in stressful environments as well as ideal settings.
Feeding: Small chunks of 1/4" meaty marine foods (shrimp, krill, silversides, mussels, octopus) should be fed every second day. You can feed less if optimum lighting is given.
More info: The condy anemone is a mover and is known for wandering around the tank. It is NOT a clownfish hosting anemone. Though, in the home aquaria it has successfully been paired with clownfish such as Tomatos, Maroons, and Clarkiis. And, while high lighting is always suggested, a more important area to focus on is pristine water conditions and a healthy feeding regimin.





a unusual instance of an atlantic anemone hosting a pacific anemone fish



references:
live aquaria
wetwebmedia
 

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excellent profile, a question about the breeding, like some other corals, are anemones also able to be cut apart by hand? in other words something like artificial reproduction?
 

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yeayea123 said:
excellent profile, a question about the breeding, like some other corals, are anemones also able to be cut apart by hand? in other words something like artificial reproduction?
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thanks for the kind words. cutting corals and propagating them is called "fragging" or fragmenting (a new term that i learned just a few weeks ag). it won't work with anemones. the reason being that they have a central stomach and mouth. cutting it apart would just destroy it (at least as far as i know). you have to wait until the anemone "splits". you CAN frag other cnidarians like zoanthids as they grow in colonies.

***EDIT***

This is a 12 year old thread that I stumbled upon again. In that time I had more experience with anemones. You can indeed cut an anemone with a blade, right down the middle and frag it like you would a coral.

Tibs said:
nice profile hyphen


EDIT: BTW would 14wpg be enough for one of those???
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thanks for the compliment. the 14wpg would depend on what type of lighting and how big of a tank. it is my opinion that they CAN thrive with normal output fluorescent lights. but there needs to be a strict feeding regimin that is high in all the right nutrients. also, keep in mind that low lighting will also bleach the anemone. while it may not look the healthiest, it is possible to have a happy anemone (in my opinion.). this opinion is shared by very few and i'm in the process of an experiment that will test the theory of anemones needing super lighting. check the sw section for more info.
 
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