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~ATLANTA BRAVES~
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I just got my 6 baby RBs last week, and I just got to wondering how long on average RB P live in captivity? Also how big do they usually get? Do they grow to the size of their tanks?
 

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"The Dancing Banana Man"
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they grow to about 12 inches in the home tank.
they should be keept in a large tank. Min 20 gals per fish.

In captivity they can live up to around 20 years if keept well.
 

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I Have No Fish but I Have Japanese Girls On My Ava
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12 is rare but can be achieve if your dedicated to the hobby. Also, plays an important role in maturity/growth of a fish.
 

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"The Dancing Banana Man"
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RhomZilla said:
12 is rare but can be achieve if your dedicated to the hobby. Also, plays an important role in maturity/growth of a fish.
I also belive its more rare becuase people dont give thier Piranha enuff room.
 

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Size of aquario does play an important role including proper temperature and occasional water changes. As for rare in size? not really, maybe in some home aquariums but not public aquariums.
 

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yep 12" is there size for adult, of course you may encounter a midget one or something to that affect that wont make it all the way... just like we have tall and short people LOL
 

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OPEFE
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As far as i know they live between 10-20 years!
 

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As far as i know they live between 10-20 years!
I have been following this post and saw many different ideas on the longevity of piranas. In truth, there is no cut off date on their age, only recorded examples of captivity. Well documented here in Oregon is a P. nattereri expiring at age 37. Not known if mortality was natural or other disease or parasite problems. There are photos of it and I plan to see about securing them for you all to see. Another one is being kept by a young lady in TN. Her P. nattereri is 33 years old. Another example is the S. rhombeus I discuss that was 30 years old when it was accidently killed. So here are a few examples of how long a P. nattereri could live and others as well. It all strictly depends on its health and how well you care for it.
 

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~ATLANTA BRAVES~
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
hastatus said:
As far as i know they live between 10-20 years!
I have been following this post and saw many different ideas on the longevity of piranas. In truth, there is no cut off date on their age, only recorded examples of captivity. Well documented here in Oregon is a P. nattereri expiring at age 37. Not known if mortality was natural or other disease or parasite problems. There are photos of it and I plan to see about securing them for you all to see. Another one is being kept by a young lady in TN. Her P. nattereri is 33 years old. Another example is the S. rhombeus I discuss that was 30 years old when it was accidently killed. So here are a few examples of how long a P. nattereri could live and others as well. It all strictly depends on its health and how well you care for it.
Thanks for chiming in hastatus, I was hoping you would have an for my question. You obviously know alot of information based on the past post I have read from you. Thanks dude
 

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Hastatus just out of curiosity have you or others in your field ever notice if a pirahnas life span is ever affected with the many different times and generations of breeding them in captivity. (red bellies) compared to the life span of those that are wild breed.
 

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have you or others in your field ever notice if a pirahnas life span is ever affected with the many different times and generations of breeding them in captivity.
Can of worms topic. There are some reports (not with piranas) about inbreeding and problems associated with it. And if you live in Oregon, the salmon are a big topic of discussion on how much genetics are effected on wild stock. There are 2 sides to this argument. Those that say genetics are not effected, therefore farm-raised vs wild stock is the same. And those of the scientific side that say wild stock is effected by farm raised. Genetics as is my understanding shows no differences between the two. But whether or not the migratory habits of salmon is effected is still unknown. Sorry to diverge from your question, but this is all that is known. Generally, I always suggest replenishing tank raised with wild stock to keep the colors true. As for the rest, its anybodies guess.
 

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EverY Dog Has His Day
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All depends on the condition they are kept and the amount of space given as far as I know they will grow as long as they are alive.
 
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