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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi just got a test kit and checked the parameters of my red belly tank. Here they are.

Ph: 5.8
Ammonia: 0ppm
Nitrites: 0ppm
Nitrates: between 40 and 80ppm so about 60ppm.

What is causing the high nitrate level? How do I bring it down? Is it harming my fish?
Also why is my ph so low? When I tested my tap water its at a 7. So why does it change in my tank? Is 5,8 too low?

Please can anybody help I'm worried.
 

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Do a 15 gallon water change every 3 days. Look for any uneaten food and take it out. Clean all filter media in tank water. Your PH is low because your nitrate is high. Lower your nitrate and your PH will be more stable.
 
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sccavee said:
Your PH is low because your nitrate is high. Lower your nitrate and your PH will be more stable.
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Right. The accumulation of organic acids and nitric acid (HNO3) will cause your aquarium's pH to be lower than your tap water pH.

If you have soft water, your pH may fall very easily with little accumulation of organic acids. If that's the case, you may want to increase your water's carbonate hardness (KH) to make the water more resistant to a decreasing pH.
 

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Hey Cobra, do you know how long your pH has been that low? A pH that's to low can lead to your nitrifying bacteria to die off. What is your source water's KH? Water changes will help in both low levels of KH and high levels nitrAtes in the tank. Water changes will replace the elements needed to stabilize your pH, but if your source water has a low KH then some other ideas to keep the pH stable might be called for.
 

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Water changes will help in both low levels of KH and high levels nitrAtes in the tank.
Wouldn't water change(s) also contribute to that bacteria thing where it can't break down fast enough if new water is presented thus high level of nitrates?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replys guys. I have done a 15 gal water change today and will keep doing them evry 3 days. No I dont have any drift wood , only some rocks and fake plants. I dont know the hardness of my water caus that test didnt come with the kit. Can the low ph really kill the bacteria in by biological filtration? I'll keep doin water changes and keep u guys posted.
 

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Juntau said:
Wouldn't water change(s) also contribute to that bacteria thing where it can't break down fast enough if new water is presented thus high level of nitrates?
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Are you asking about nitrItes? NitrAtes are the end result of the nitrogen cycle, and the best way to remove it is through water changes.

Cobra Posted Today said:
Thanks for the replys guys. I have done a 15 gal water change today and will keep doing them evry 3 days. No I dont have any drift wood , only some rocks and fake plants. I dont know the hardness of my water caus that test didnt come with the kit. Can the low ph really kill the bacteria in by biological filtration? I'll keep doin water changes and keep u guys posted.
I don't remember the exact number of pH that will lead to nitrifying bacteria to die off. But if the water becomes to acidic it will kill it.
 
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