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"The Dancing Banana Man"
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I like these things, i saw one about 7 years ago in the best pet store i ever saw. i knew the owner. To bad he closed shop after 5 years. it was freekn great!

He had a moniter lizard in there. I think it was 4 feet and 120 bucks? Is that right? I know there are diffrent ones, some from the nile, that can dive under water for an hour. Some that get over 350 lbs. and live only on land.

Any one know any thing about em?
thanks
Bobme
 

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reasonably awesome
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they're big lizards that subsist primarily on flesh. Komodo Dragon is the biggest of them all, gets 10 feet long and weighs 300+lbs. I've seen alot of them kept like pets. They're essentially meat-eating iguanas as far as petkeeping aspects go, like they can too be kept on leashes and petted and brought around.

Pretty neat pet, I'd think.
 

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"The Dancing Banana Man"
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well but the komodo Dragon, is well protected.
Although often regarded as pests, they are not a serious menace to humans. In order to protect the dragon, the Indonesian government has made the islands of Padar and Rintja into nature reserves for both the lizard and its prey. Commercial trade in specimens or skins is illegal under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.
So, i guess i need to buy the smaller one?
 

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I friend of mine had one a long time ago they are great but unless your work at a zoo they are a little unpractical. His at the size of 3-4 feet would his at his cat, and probably would of eaten it if the cat wsa put in the cage.
 

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.pocketful of sunshine.
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*Moved to the Non-Piranha Forum*
 

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There's a couple dwarf species of monitors like the Timur monitor I think. The pet store I worked at back then have them occasionally. Its been years so I forgot. Never really paid much attention to reptiles
 

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reasonably awesome
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here's a highlight from innes' link

An overview of monitors commonly sold in the pet trade.
At the time of writing, the most commonly sold monitors in the pet trade are the African savannah monitor (Varanus exanthematicus) and the African Nile monitor (Varanus niloticus). As a rule, savannah monitors grow moderately large (3 1/2 feet to 5 feet, occasionally larger depending on subspecies or country of origin), adapt well to captivity and, when raised from young animals and regularly handled, tend to become quite tame.

Nile monitors also adapt well to captivity, grow relatively large (4 to 7 feet depending on variety and country of origin) but frequently remain nervous. They do not typically become as docile as savannah or water monitors, but may become remarkably tame under the right conditions.

Other monitors sold in significant numbers in the pet trade include the Asian water monitor (Varanus salvator) which grows to 5-9 feet. These large monitors when raised from young animals and regularly handled are among the most docile of the monitors. On the other hand, imported adults of this species can be very difficult to handle and aggressive when defending themselves. Nonetheless Asian water monitors are one of the most intelligent of the lizards and this feature along with their large size and tendency toward docility make them very popular among fanciers of large monitors. A few other monitor species are regularly available in small numbers in the pet trade such as Dumeril's monitors (Varanus dumerilii), black rough-necked monitors (Varanus rudicollis) and mangrove monitors (Varanus indicus). These are moderately large and relatively easy to manage species. They present no special problems in handling.

Often monitors imported in small numbers in recent years include rare Australasian species (Varanus prasinus ssp., Varanus timorensis, Varanus salvadorii). Only the Papuan monitor (V. salvadorii), because of its large size (this is the second largest species of lizard) and relatively large teeth, warrant special precautions and housing as mentioned in these guidelines. These large monitors have been imported in very small numbers and sold at very high prices, which has effectively restricted their ownership to the more specialized and experienced collectors. The relative rarity of these lizards in herpetoculture doesn't warrant any special local regulations for ownership other than the guidelines mentioned above.
 

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reasonably awesome
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no space (live with parents, they won't allow it), little $$$ (and what little i do make is going to a 240+ aquarium in the near future)
 

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Do not get a monitor Lizard,

They make really crappy pets, if you want
a lizard get a Bearded dragon or Leopard gecko,
They are pet lizards, monitors while being absolutly
Awesome animals, really are not suited for the general
beginner to Herp keeping,

they require specialized care that
is not easy to replicate in captivity,

The information given in that link is crap, I do not have the time to blow holes
large enough to drive a semi through,(Which would be easy)

but will say this real quick,
I worked with these Lizards for some 6 years and can tell you
they do not Tame easily, in fact it's rare, especially with the Nile,
Waters do tend to be more calm but are still very unpredictable,
Savannah, and black or White throats are also very iffy as to
temperment, most are wild caught and few survive long
without proper care which is rare or impossable to get out of a pet
shop employee, or the BS spewed on the internet

the last remarks I find ammusing
Only the Papuan monitor (V. salvadorii), because of its large size (this is the second largest species of lizard) and relatively large teeth, warrant special precautions and housing as mentioned in these guidelines. These large monitors have been imported in very small numbers and sold at very high prices, which has effectively restricted their ownership to the more specialized and experienced collectors. The relative rarity of these lizards in herpetoculture doesn't warrant any special local regulations for ownership other than the guidelines mentioned above
Actually the croc monitor is the Largest in length, unfortuntly they are quite common
and easy to find, and all monitors should only be kept by specialized and experianced
collectors. seeing as I find them regularly running around the parks
here in Michigan I would say yeah they do need
local laws and regulations restricting who can own them as many do not really
understand Monitor lizards are not Dogs and really are not Pets at all.
 

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"The Dancing Banana Man"
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yes but i been keeping lizards and reptials for about 8 years.
 

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reasonably awesome
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Polypterus said:
Do not get a monitor Lizard,

They make really crappy pets, if you want
a lizard get a Bearded dragon or Leopard gecko,
They are pet lizards, monitors while being absolutly
Awesome animals, really are not suited for the general
beginner to Herp keeping,

they require specialized care that
is not easy to replicate in captivity,

The information given in that link is crap, I do not have the time to blow holes
large enough to drive a semi through,(Which would be easy)

but will say this real quick,
I worked with these Lizards for some 6 years and can tell you
they do not Tame easily, in fact it's rare, especially with the Nile,
Waters do tend to be more calm but are still very unpredictable,
Savannah, and black or White throats are also very iffy as to
temperment, most are wild caught and few survive long
without proper care which is rare or impossable to get out of a pet
shop employee, or the BS spewed on the internet

the last remarks I find ammusing
Only the Papuan monitor (V. salvadorii), because of its large size (this is the second largest species of lizard) and relatively large teeth, warrant special precautions and housing as mentioned in these guidelines. These large monitors have been imported in very small numbers and sold at very high prices, which has effectively restricted their ownership to the more specialized and experienced collectors. The relative rarity of these lizards in herpetoculture doesn't warrant any special local regulations for ownership other than the guidelines mentioned above
Actually the croc monitor is the Largest in length, unfortuntly they are quite common
and easy to find, and all monitors should only be kept by specialized and experianced
collectors. seeing as I find them regularly running around the parks
here in Michigan I would say yeah they do need
local laws and regulations restricting who can own them as many do not really
understand Monitor lizards are not Dogs and really are not Pets at all.
well do elaborate when u get the time plz!
 
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