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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm pretty sure this topic should go in this section, if not, im sorry. ok guys i just tested my water for the first time. everything was cool, ammonia: very low, Ph around 7-7.5 but the problem was my nitrite level. It was like out the roof. It was the color for 3.3-33 mg/l. My book says that it should be under .8 mg/l. Could someone please tell me what this means and how to lower it? The tank is a 29 gallon with my 8 inch red snakehead. I have an aquatech 40-60 filter if that helps any. The tank has been running for about a month now and i do believe it was cycled properly. Thanks for any input.
 

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I Have No Fish but I Have Japanese Girls On My Ava
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Not exactly sure about the PH balance for SnakeHeads, but for Ps.. 6.5 is neutral, while 7.0 is considered perfect. Driftwood or certain rocks (sorry, I cant think of the kind) were known to help lower PH levels. I dont understand how your ammonia level can be perfect, but nitrate high. Tampering with the ammonia/nitrate levels would be fatal to any fish if the level ever spikes. Also, since you've stated that your Snakehead has been in the tank already, I wouldn't worry much. As long as you dont see any unusual coloration or signs of skin irritations, then your Snakehead should be fine.

Any other opinion would be more than accepted..
 

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Death is fair to everyone.
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O.k. Nitrite is usually detected when ammonia is present. Somethings wrong with your biolodgical filtration. For good biolodgical filtration you will need a filter big enough for the waste output of the disired fish. I like 10x turn over rate.(10 times the tank size per hour) Alot of oxygen By air stone or powerhead. And ugfs help a great deal. I know some critique them but they work! Canister filter is the other alternative to under grave filters. And regular waterchanges. I whould add 1 teaspoon of salt per 10 gals. to make the nitrite less poisonous to your fish. You will need alot of airation. The more the better. And i whould help the cycle with bio spira. Fish will get very sick from nirites. It screws their hemoglobin up. And their ammune system is rendered useless. I whould pitch the aquatec filter. (walmart garbage) And get a fluval 204 canister filter big als has them for 50 dollars. If you can't. Get a ugf for under 10 dollars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i already put salt in the tank, it said on my test kit to try to clean the filter. Would that help any? right after testing the water, i did a 20% change and retested and the nitrite levels were the same. so idk what to do? :sad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i just thought of something else. I cycled the tank and all and after about 3 weeks the filter stops working, wouldnt even do anything. So i returned it and got a new one. This happened about 2 weeks ago? would this have anything to do with the high nitrite levels? maybe i got rid of the good bacteria that breaks it down? is there anything i can do to get that bacteria back? thanks
 

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The ASSMAN
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Slow down people!!
He is talking about nitrIte level, not NirtAte level. Your tank is not cycled, it is as simple as that. By returning your filter, if you did not keep the old media, you started the cycle over again. DONT do any water changes, DONT do any gravle vacs, and DONT clean your filter, this will just make it take longer. You are getting a nitrIte spike, the last process in the cycle. When the nitrites drop and the NitAtes go way up, then you tank is done cycling. Then do a 50% water change but dont mess with the filter or gravel for another month or so, let the bacteria build up.
 

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grosse gurke said:
Slow down people!!
He is talking about nitrIte level, not NirtAte level. Your tank is not cycled, it is as simple as that. By returning your filter, if you did not keep the old media, you started the cycle over again. DONT do any water changes, DONT do any gravle vacs, and DONT clean your filter, this will just make it take longer. You are getting a nitrIte spike, the last process in the cycle. When the nitrites drop and the NitAtes go way up, then you tank is done cycling. Then do a 50% water change but dont mess with the filter or gravel for another month or so, let the bacteria build up.
It's as simple as that
 

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Read this letting the NITRITES sit can cause serious damage.
Nitrites will not accumulate to dangerous levels in a balanced tank. Nitrite causes stress for fish even as low as 0.5 ppm. Levels exceeding 10-20 ppm are lethal over a period of time. Immediate action is required. Water changes are essential in diluting nitrites. This only helps if the tank is balanced, because frequent water changes will not only effect the short-term nitrite concentration, but all other values as well. Accumulating nitrite is a sign of an imbalanced tank.

Algone takes a natural approach in reducing nitrite levels in fresh and saltwater tanks. Microorganisms contained within the pouch will feed off nitrogen compounds as soon as activated by submerging the pouch in the water. The absorbed nitrogen compounds are transformed into micro bacterial protein, without leaching them back into the tank. Frequent (daily/ weekly/ or high volume) water changes can be avoided in order to bring the tank back in balance. A regular maintenance of changing the water (10-15% every other week) should be maintained, as other nutrients need to be replenished or removed

I got this from this siteAlgone
 

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The ASSMAN
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Raptor,
A nitrite spike is part of the natrual cycle. First an ammonia spike, then a nitrite spike, then high amounts of nitrates. Yes it can be harmful to fish, that is why most people cycle a tank before introducing the fish they plan on keeping, however, people cycle tanks all the time using less hardy fish than a snakehead. It would be best to get the snakehead into a cycled tank and continue the cycle with feeders, but I dont think that is possible in klockz's situation.
You are reading an advertisement and IMO the natural way to lower nitrites is to let the benificial bacteria in the filter do it for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
oh crud, i did a 20% water change and vaccumed my gravel right after i tested the water. So i guess ill just have to wait. anything i could do to speed along the process? and no, moving the fish is not an option. thanks
 

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The ASSMAN
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Dont add any more bio load (feeders), the snakehead is putting off enough. If I was really worried about my fish, I would consider either moving him to a LFS (if one will take him for a while), or get some filter media or gravel from a LFS and add it to my filter compartment (encased in a nylon) to possibly jump start the last phase of the cycle. I cant guarantee anything, but I think he will be fine.
 

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I have went thru this also. I have done a few searches and all the ones i read has said do waterchanges. I am no one to say you were wrong. I have added the bio spira have had no probs. I used to use ugfs religiously. And took them out one day. Reading they are bad. Should have searched on that one. But i had medicated and killed all bacteria in tank and found myself in that same situation. I have taken advise from people i trust. That say if i don't have a ugf to use a canister filter. I did and threw in some bio spira. And all my problems ended. I even medicated again. Because of the fish that i recieved had ich
After i medicated all the water perimeters were fine to date.
 

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The ASSMAN
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I have no problem if you disagree with me, I could be wrong, but I understand the cycle pretty well and believe I know what his problem is.

Water changes are essential in diluting nitrites. This only helps if the tank is balanced, because frequent water changes will not only effect the short-term nitrite concentration, but all other values as well. Accumulating nitrite is a sign of an imbalanced tank.
In looking at the quote from you previous post, it does not make sense to me and is contradicting it self. NitrAtes accumulate and are reduced by water changes in a cycled tank. NitrItes are a sign of an uncycled tank.

I have added the bio spira have had no probs.
I agree with you about bio-spira, I have heard great things about it.
 

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I just pasted from the link on that whole thred on that. Except the first line.
 
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