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I have thought about this over and over, and think I have finally decieded to try to raise some Discus. I need to save up some money first, but I have a 75 and am thinking of getting 5 or 6. We have 2 pet stores that I trust to buy from, that I can get them from. One has "mixed" Discus, 2-2.5", for 39.99 a peice, or 3 for 100. I am buddies with the fish guy at the other place, so I could probably get a little better deal, but havn't checked yet. Could someone please post the water conditions that would be perfect for them. I have searched, but havn't found much about the water PH or anything like that. Any information on that would be great.

Also, I have been reading about what to feed them, and I have seen things like beefheart, bloodworms, and brine shrimp. What are the main foods that they like? I have posted a couple of pictures of my tank, let me know if this is an Okay setup. Right now I have 2 Cichlids, and have the temp at around 80-82 degree's. Is that a good temp, or what should I change it to? I am also running an Xp3 for a filter, and am thinking of maybe getting a second Xp3.. or would that be overkill?

Thanks in advance..
Jon

Edit:

I found the site; www.discusland.com .. Does anyone know if they have any good information?
 

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I'll say this much. They're not as hard or as easy as people say.


The key is the water parameters, which they prefer to be acidic. My ways of fish keeping have always been to be lazy and go with fish that like how water is in the tap (usually hard and alkaline). Rarely does water come out of the tap soft and acidic.

So you've got to learn some chemistry about buffers and pH and how pH and waste interact, etc. etc. You definitely will need good testing equipment for nitrogen products and pH and probably KH and GH hardness as well.

Also, TFH has an article every month about discus. Good stuff there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well I have a 40$ test kit that tests Amonia, Ph, High PH, Nitrate, and Nitrite. Its the liquid drops, not the test strips, and I know those are a lot more accurate. Last time I checked my water, which was 2 days ago, it was at the following:

Ammonia: 0
PH: like 7.2
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 0
 

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Discus are one of the most rewarding and entertaining fish in the hobby. While it is always said that they need tons of work, with thorough research and a proper education, they are not as hard as they are made out to be. The toughest part is when they are young, after about 4-5" they are as bulletproof as any other cichlid.

The diet when young should consist of blood worms, beef heart, brine shrimp, and the like, but once they get older they can and should be switched over to prepared dry foods, like new life spectrum and other discus type foods. Not only is feeding them frozen foods expensive, but it also tends to be too rich for older discus.

Water should have a low pH (about 6.5 should be good) and nice soft water. But before you start dumping chemicals in, just make sure that you keep your water clean. As long as you do very vigorous water changes you should not have to worry about the parameters, atleast not with most commercial bred types of which you spoke.

Temperature should be high-quite high, especially with babies. Discus like water between 82-86*. Your filtration sounds good, and there is no such thing as overkill, but just make sure not to use that as an excuse for sub-par water changes. I'm always on the extreme side, and I do 50% twice a week, and while thats a little much, to make sure you get good full grown discus (and discus DO stunt very easily) you should change at least 50% of the water a week.

Discus always do better in groups more than 6, and in your tank I would recomend 6-8. I'm not sure if you already know this, but those fish you already have in there have got to go. I myself would keep your discus alone, as they do not fare well with other fish, and will do better just alone. If you are going to add something, stick with fish like Corys and small tetras like Cardinals and Rummynoses.

Good luck!
 

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If you're going to raise them, might as well get an established strain of fish, and not some pet store mix up.
 

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to lower the PH which you might need to do just put some peatmoss in your filter in a panty hose stocking and it will keep the ph low.

its very entertaining to watch the babies eat the slime off of their parents body
 
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