Piranhas Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
"Nitro"
Joined
·
5,386 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
theres a couple things you should get if your new, and thats a test kit for ammonia, nitrate and nitrite. these are available at any fish store. when a tank is new it will have to cycle, this is when the benifecial bacteria grows to break down the ammonia produced by the fish.it may become cloudy during this process, its perfectly normal and will clear up on its own.cycleing is one thing not many really know about, but is very important.below is a guide to the cycleing process. good luck with your fish, I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

i'm posting this in piranha discussion because this seems to be where the most beginner fish hobbyists on this board are piranha-fury. here it is in elementary terms, because this is as technical as i know how to say it. but having this very small grasp on what goes on in your tank will hopefully save some fish and make veteran fish keepers not hate you (as much ).

watch this:

1. fish goes in tank
2. fish eats some food, lets some rot at the bottom
3. fish urinates and defecates
4. uneaten food and urine and feces form toxic ammonia
5. toxic ammonia burns fish's gills, eyes, fins, skin, etc
6. ammonia devouring bacteria that occur naturally all around us colonize in the tank and begin feeding on the ammonia, and multiplying
7. ammonia eating bacteria also has to relieve itself, and its waste is what we call nitrItes. Nitrites are toxic to fish as well, not quite as bad as ammonia burning though.
8. other naturally occuring bacteria arrive and devour the nitrItes and multiply
9. nitrIte eating bacteria also has to relieve itself, and its waste is what we call nitrAtes.
10. nothing in freshwater consumes nitrAtes, with the exception of a LARGE amount of water plants. you do a water change to lower nitrates.

Now, none of this information is scientific, but it's straight forward and is on the general right track. if the tank already had these bacteria in them, we wouldn't have to subject the fish to the potentially deadly consequences of going to the bathroom.

Lets pose a few questions now:

Q: what can i do to cycle my tank?

A: you can buy cheap fish from the store and throw them in your water. this is the most commonly used method (besides those of you who throw your expensive fish in the same water, but of course you'll have no need to do this anymore when armed with the above knowledge! ) and this method works. you can also add capfuls of regular unscented (make sure there is nothing else in it) household ammonia found at your grocery store, or a wal-mart, for example. The absolute best way to cycle your tank is to use filter media and/ or gravel from an existing cycled tank and add it to yours. The bacteria are already present.

Q: how do i know if the cycle is working?

A: you initially need three test kits (besides a ph test kit). These kits are labeled as Ammonia, NitrIte, and NitrAte test kits. after a few days of adding ammonia to your tank daily, check your ammonia. check it every day or every other day. you should notice the level rising for a while, but then one day, it will lower. as it lowers it should keep lowering. Check for NitrItes. follow the same steps with this as you did with the ammonia kit. when it lowers, check for NitrAtes. the presence of nitrAtes means your well on your way! when ammonia and nitrItes are at 0 and you're detecting nitrAtes, do a water change and add your fish (not too many fish at once, you'll push the cycle past it's limit if your ammonia dosing was too low).

Q: my tank's already cycled, but i'm detecting ammonia, what happend?

A: overfeeding beyond the tanks current "bio-bacteria" load, or something dying in the tank will cause a surge. do a water change, cut back on feeding, find and remove whatever is decaying in your tank.

Q: but i have tough fish, i heard they can handle the cycle? is this true?

A: sure some fish can handle it. it's like smoking. you poison yourself and you might be okay, or it may cause you to get cancer etc., which is a reduction in your health, well being, and life span. any tough fish that is used to cycle the tank, if they live can almost assuredly be found to have damaged gills or eyesight, due to the burning that is caused by concentrations of their own wastes. risk it if you want to, that $400 dollar fish might live a few years longer though, if you excercise patience.
 

·
joey'd is da man
Joined
·
14,077 Posts
I think I've seen this somwhere before : cycling for dummies?
Nice one Nitrofish, we needed something like this here.
 

·
"Nitro"
Joined
·
5,386 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
mdemers883 said:
If I remember right that is Narcisus Narcosis post from predatoryfish.net in the saved topics forum.

Mark
yes it sure was,but great info anyhow
 

·
"Nitro"
Joined
·
5,386 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
for some reason i can't edit it to give credit to Narcisus Narcosis post from predatoryfish.net for the original post on predatoryfish.net. but Its good info and the subject has come up alot latley, so I thought it was nessary to copy the info for everyone here that are not on predatoryfish.net
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top