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how big of a tank can i put on the second story of a house? i was thinking of putting an 80 gallon in my room, would that be too heavy? it would be in the corner of my room. any thoughts? thanks.
 

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I had a 75gallon tank in my 2nd floor apt. for 3 years with no problems
 

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As long as you put it in the corner or somewhere else that has strong support, like above one (or more) first floor walls, I don't think you need to worry too much. This is assuming, though, that it's a relatively sturdy house, and that the walls aren't falling apart...
 

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Its all about the quality of your house. You will be fine with only an 80 gallon. Just dont expect to put it in the center of the room.
 

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i've seen up to a 75. personally, i wouldnt do any more than a 55. but, its always safer to get a longer tank. so it spans more joists. a corner tank might be trouble if its too big, its all compressed into one area, and consequently it would only span a few joists. whereas, if it was a rectangle tank, then it would span a bunch of joists. make sure the two corners are both load bearing walls, walls that go through the first floor and end in the cellar with a beam usually made of 3 2x10's. usually that kind of corner is a little tough to find...but its better to look hard than to have your walls collapse. hehe. invest in a stud finder and run it over the ceiling under your room to find out just how many joists it spans.
 

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you could also get a big sheet of ply wood and place your aquarium on it..make sure you cover up the ply wood with extra carpet or a rug..this should reduce the pressure of the tank stand as it puts weight in just a small area also consider lining it against a load bearing wall or over a beam

also it depends on the flooring of your house...if steel beams were used or what not
 

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well lets say that total weight is somewhere around 12 pounds per gallon. so you would have somewhere around about 900 to 1000 pouns, i would test i by having you and about 10 buddies stand as close as possible, or sit on the stand, if the floor can hold this, which it most definately SHOULD, then it can hold your tank.
 

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i've got a 180 on the 3rd floor of an apartment complex right now
 

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i cant say i have ever heard of a tank going through a floor.
 

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I've got a 125 on the second floor of my place. Just keep it close to a wall that goes all the way to the ground, and keep an eye out for small cracking on the wall. The drywall cracking is a sure sign it's gonna go.

But as Alan said, I've never seen someone post a tank falling through the floor either. Do a search and see if you can dig anything up.
 

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i know a guy with a 300 gallon on a 4th floor apartment :rasp:

the way apartments are made..there really well be no problem
 

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ok, two theories posted just dont work. the plywood....reason: plywood is QUITE flimsy. take a sheet off of the rack at home depot and try to bend it. it will bend with ease. therefore, it doesnt distribute the weight very good, and as such, it just adds more weight to your floor and looks really bad. a better alternative to this is to make a box-type platform with 2X4's spanning to 4x4's under a sheet of ply or particle board. this will distribute the weight MUCH better.
also, the people standing on top of the stand thing. that doesnt work because, thats a significant load for a short period of time. if you are wondering if a certain piece of wood will hold you, how would you test it? you would jump right? well, that is a lot of load for a SHORT duration, and as such, it may not break under that load, rather, it would break after a couple days or weeks of continuous exposure to that load. the people standing on the stand would be an example of that.
here's a significant point of interest. just because your floor doesnt "break" doesnt mean that it is not damaged. if the load is heavy enough, without being OVERLY heavy, it will gradually bend the joists under the floor. and in a couple years, ten even, the floor joists will snap at the center, your floor will bow in the middle, or the joists doing the supporting will all be off-centered because they've got so much pressure on them.
some apartments this is not a problem for, either because they used steel beams for construction instead of wood joists, or because its concrete. either way, that type of structure could easily handle a 300 gallon tank. if you have doubt about it, do not do it. assumption is the root of all failure.
 

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I would thin that above a small room....like a bathroom or closet would support a fairly large tank. The larger the footprint the less stress on your floor. I would go no more than 75 gallons without very stong knowledge of the floor stucture.
 

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r1dermon said:
ok, two theories posted just dont work. the plywood....reason: plywood is QUITE flimsy. take a sheet off of the rack at home depot and try to bend it. it will bend with ease. therefore, it doesnt distribute the weight very good, and as such, it just adds more weight to your floor and looks really bad. a better alternative to this is to make a box-type platform with 2X4's spanning to 4x4's under a sheet of ply or particle board. this will distribute the weight MUCH better.
also, the people standing on top of the stand thing. that doesnt work because, thats a significant load for a short period of time. if you are wondering if a certain piece of wood will hold you, how would you test it? you would jump right? well, that is a lot of load for a SHORT duration, and as such, it may not break under that load, rather, it would break after a couple days or weeks of continuous exposure to that load. the people standing on the stand would be an example of that.
here's a significant point of interest. just because your floor doesnt "break" doesnt mean that it is not damaged. if the load is heavy enough, without being OVERLY heavy, it will gradually bend the joists under the floor. and in a couple years, ten even, the floor joists will snap at the center, your floor will bow in the middle, or the joists doing the supporting will all be off-centered because they've got so much pressure on them.
some apartments this is not a problem for, either because they used steel beams for construction instead of wood joists, or because its concrete. either way, that type of structure could easily handle a 300 gallon tank. if you have doubt about it, do not do it. assumption is the root of all failure.

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Exactly what I was going to say, and I couldnt of put it any better myself.

My opinion is that if your house is fairly modern (as in not an old rickety house) you'll be fine with an 80Gal. Put it close to a load bearing wall, and fine a stand that evenly distributes the weight over a large area if you are still unsure.

BTW- I used to have a 150 Gal on the 2nd floor of my house with no problems. I now have a 120Gal on a 4th Floor apartment with no rpoblems also (but these are brand new and steel/concrete built!)

 

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its also good to note that some older structures, circa early 1900's are actually stronger than some more modern homes. back then, a 2x10 was actually 2x10 inches, however, today its actually less than that, and materials costs build up quickly, foremen dont like to be shoveling huge money into a house when they can cut a few corners and still meet code. honestly, i'd get a 75 long and be happy. hehe. a 90 in the corner is risky, my grandmothers house, built in the early 1900's can carry tremendous loads, but, thats because it was built like a tank. your house may not be.
 
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