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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since my mother won't allow a Husky I have narrowed it down to these Amazing dogs.

A guy i use to work with had a Great Dane and brought it to work since he always seemed to get kicked out and one day had to bring the dog to work. I thought it was an amazing dog but as for my boss he said it looked like a horse. Haha.

Dobermans have always fascinated me with just the way they are. Period.

Iv read about these dogs long before wanting a dog. And I actually think one of these three would suit me and my life style the best.

I'm wondering if anyone here has ever had or knew someone who has one of these dogs and would like to post thoughts on the breeds.
 

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Wavy
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I grew up around dobermans since my uncle used to breed them. Me and leasure will tell you, dobermans are the best dogs you will ever own.
 

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I have a doberman. They require lots of exercise. They are smart and easy to train dogs.

Heres a couple pics...
Did you own it since it was a puppy? is it a male or female?

i have a few questions.

-How long did it take you to house break the dog?
-Is the dog close to everyone or mostly just one person since I read it depends on if the family or one member looks after it.
- Does your dog know a lot of commands? Were they fairly easy to teach?

Also I am hoping if i get a Doberman its ears are already cropped. if not i'm leaving them the way they are since I dont wanna take the extra time on keeping the wraps on its ears 24/7 and peeling off the scabs when its time.
 

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What about Shepherds?

Edit: Sorry for sounding like an ass lol, but hey true things. Dogs like Rottie, Shepherds, Dobermans would make me wanna get out of there!
they are such guard dogs that would literally stand their ground aggressively. What's the advise if one of these dogs chases you? RUUUUUUUUNNNNNNNN!!!
 

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We've had him since he was a puppy. He was housebroke in about a month or so as long as you made sure you let him out enough. Dobermans are a smart dog and are really easy to train. They aren't stubborn and like to please. They tend to like everybody that they're familiar with but at the same time usually like one person best. They are clean dogs, and don't shed too bad. Oh yeah, if you get one with cropped ears as a pup, you will DEFINATELY have to deal with taping up its ears. Ours had a styrofoam cup glued to his head and tampons in his ears to keep them straight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
We've had him since he was a puppy. He was housebroke in about a month or so as long as you made sure you let him out enough. Dobermans are a smart dog and are really easy to train. They aren't stubborn and like to please. They tend to like everybody that they're familiar with but at the same time usually like one person best. They are clean dogs, and don't shed too bad.
Awesome info. Not shedding to much is a bonus and a half. If i get one I would be taking care of it feeding, walks, grooming if needed, playing and such. I'm depending on a female since im a male owner..try that out but a male would prob do. what ever the breeder has
 

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We've had him since he was a puppy. He was housebroke in about a month or so as long as you made sure you let him out enough. Dobermans are a smart dog and are really easy to train. They aren't stubborn and like to please. They tend to like everybody that they're familiar with but at the same time usually like one person best. They are clean dogs, and don't shed too bad.
Awesome info. Not shedding to much is a bonus and a half. If i get one I would be taking care of it feeding, walks, grooming if needed, playing and such. I'm depending on a female since im a male owner..try that out but a male would prob do. what ever the breeder has
[/quote]
I will also say this, I would stay away from "blue" or "fawn" dobermans since they are a kind of breeding defect and can have serious health problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We've had him since he was a puppy. He was housebroke in about a month or so as long as you made sure you let him out enough. Dobermans are a smart dog and are really easy to train. They aren't stubborn and like to please. They tend to like everybody that they're familiar with but at the same time usually like one person best. They are clean dogs, and don't shed too bad.
Awesome info. Not shedding to much is a bonus and a half. If i get one I would be taking care of it feeding, walks, grooming if needed, playing and such. I'm depending on a female since im a male owner..try that out but a male would prob do. what ever the breeder has
[/quote]
I will also say this, I would stay away from "blue" or "fawn" dobermans since they are a kind of breeding defect and can have serious health problems.
[/quote]

Oh really eh? So either black or the reddish coat?
 

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We've had him since he was a puppy. He was housebroke in about a month or so as long as you made sure you let him out enough. Dobermans are a smart dog and are really easy to train. They aren't stubborn and like to please. They tend to like everybody that they're familiar with but at the same time usually like one person best. They are clean dogs, and don't shed too bad.
Awesome info. Not shedding to much is a bonus and a half. If i get one I would be taking care of it feeding, walks, grooming if needed, playing and such. I'm depending on a female since im a male owner..try that out but a male would prob do. what ever the breeder has
[/quote]
I will also say this, I would stay away from "blue" or "fawn" dobermans since they are a kind of breeding defect and can have serious health problems.
[/quote]

Oh really eh? So either black or the reddish coat?
[/quote]
Yep, reds and black are the standard :nod:
 

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Don't f*ck with the fairy.
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Danes have a very sad lifespan, the average dane is lucky to make 7 or 8. Getting one as a puppy requires careful watch on their food intake to ensure proper growth.

Dogs like Shepherds and Dobes require knowing the breed's temperament, as well as being very in tune with your dogs. They are extremely empathetic and pick up on the littlest things. I grew up with many protection breeds (one grandmother had dobes and rotties, the other had schutzhund trained shepherdS) so i'd say your #1 requirement with those is knowing how to train and getting proper help training them the right way.

edit: I should also mention hip displaysia in all of the above mentioned breeds, with a special note to Shepherds and Danes.
 

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Danes and the others shouldn't even be compared. The others are active while danes are the laziest dogs you'll ever meet, well maybe mastiff is just as lazy. Danes are content with going outside once day for a quick romp, and then the rest of the day only needing to go out for quick bathroom breaks. My male dane can hold his bathroom breaks off for like 12 hours at a time if not more. If it's not fair weather to him, which means at least 70 degrees and sunny he doesn't want to go out. He'd rather hold it. I think they get lazier as they age. He can be the biggest wuss over the smallest thing.

They get big, and for the most part are messy eaters. Very smart. Raised food and water bowls are good. No kids can't ride them. Some slober, some not as much. They are big and well need help getting in the car sometimes if it's a high height and they're tired. Low energy level. And don't let the short lifespan scare you, I know some that had to be put down at 5 years but I know some who are 9-10 and still going. HTH
 

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Your Kung Fu is No Good Here...
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Did you own it since it was a puppy? is it a male or female?

i have a few questions.

-How long did it take you to house break the dog?
-Is the dog close to everyone or mostly just one person since I read it depends on if the family or one member looks after it.
- Does your dog know a lot of commands? Were they fairly easy to teach?

Also I am hoping if i get a Doberman its ears are already cropped. if not i'm leaving them the way they are since I dont wanna take the extra time on keeping the wraps on its ears 24/7 and peeling off the scabs when its time.
Not to get into this argument again, but why even get one with cropped ears in the first place. Its alot less stress on the dog to leave them uncut, not to mention cropping has NO value or reason to do it, and they look alot better with them left alone. Just my opinion on that.

As far as a breed choice goes, both are great breeds but both require alot of special attention and in the case of both, particularly Dobermans, experience with dogs with dominant tendencies. Before you decide on getting a breed which will require ALOT of exercise and rigid training, you might want to seriously consider what kind of time and commitment you are willing to put it. If you dont have several hours every day to spend exercising a dog, a breed like a dobermans might not be the best choice for you.

Theres alot of knowledgable people here regarding dogs and breeds, and maybe some you are less familiar with. I suggest you post some information regarding REALISTICALLY how much daily time you have to spend exercising, training, grooming, caring for etc a dog, and also financially what your situation is for a dog. For example great danes/mastiffs/rotties etc eat ALOT and it gets VERY expensive. Along with food costs bigger breeds have higher vet bills, often more health problems, sometimes insurance considerations etc. ALOT to consider when looking into some of these breeds.
 

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Danes have a very sad lifespan, the average dane is lucky to make 7 or 8. Getting one as a puppy requires careful watch on their food intake to ensure proper growth.

Dogs like Shepherds and Dobes require knowing the breed's temperament, as well as being very in tune with your dogs. They are extremely empathetic and pick up on the littlest things. I grew up with many protection breeds (one grandmother had dobes and rotties, the other had schutzhund trained shepherdS) so i'd say your #1 requirement with those is knowing how to train and getting proper help training them the right way.

edit: I should also mention hip displaysia in all of the above mentioned breeds, with a special note to Shepherds and Danes.
Ive owned great danes most of my life (as well as boxers). I have yet to have a great dane w/ lived less than 8 years (most @ 10). Bloat is a problem with the breed but knowing how to properly feed the animal will take care of that. To talk about their "shorter lifespan" instead of all the positives about the breed... From personal experience their lifespan is no diffrent than any other large breed.
 

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out of the two dogs you listed, i would say doberman, but you have to understand the breed very well in order to own one successfully.

will this be your first dog? just a question :D

i love dobermans, they are great dogs, just very misunderstood. my cousin has one that is the most loveable funny dog ive ever seen...but some ppl treat them wrong and turn them into bad dogs. a friend of mine had a doberman that his dad kicked the crap out of (total asshole dad) and the dog would attack my friend...and anyone else who went in the house.

the thing about great danes is their lifespan
as tinkerbelle said, its sad that they only live 8-9 years usually...sometimes less. its hard to get attatched to a dog, then it dies so fast.

we have an irish wolfhound cross briard. he's big, 145lbs. briards usually live 11-13 years, while wolfhounds have a lifespan similar to a great dane. he's 6 and a half right now and we are concerned about how much longer he's going to live. he's still very healthy and isnt slowing down, but i can barely detect the change in his bark that is the first sign that he's getting old. we hope he's going to live 10-11 with a lot of proper excercise and nutrition, but who knows
that's the hardest part of owning an extra large doggie
 

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you mom wont allow a husky but she will allow you to keep a horse........... i mean great dane in the house?
 

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out of the two dogs you listed, i would say doberman, but you have to understand the breed very well in order to own one successfully.

will this be your first dog? just a question :D

i love dobermans, they are great dogs, just very misunderstood. my cousin has one that is the most loveable funny dog ive ever seen...but some ppl treat them wrong and turn them into bad dogs. a friend of mine had a doberman that his dad kicked the crap out of (total asshole dad) and the dog would attack my friend...and anyone else who went in the house.

the thing about great danes is their lifespan
as tinkerbelle said, its sad that they only live 8-9 years usually...sometimes less. its hard to get attatched to a dog, then it dies so fast.

we have an irish wolfhound cross briard. he's big, 145lbs. briards usually live 11-13 years, while wolfhounds have a lifespan similar to a great dane. he's 6 and a half right now and we are concerned about how much longer he's going to live. he's still very healthy and isnt slowing down, but i can barely detect the change in his bark that is the first sign that he's getting old. we hope he's going to live 10-11 with a lot of proper excercise and nutrition, but who knows
that's the hardest part of owning an extra large doggie
Family s first dog, mother had one before. And ucle owns huskys iv been around them all my life.

Everyones gotta start off with some breed. I dislike smaller dogs so i'm going for one of these.

Since iv been looking online and in the papers for dobe pups and cant find any i think i will go to an animal shelter. If I still cant find a pup or close to it i may adopt one but that gets me wary
 
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