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Sorry newbie here. I have a school of juvenilles RBP (about 2inch each, 23 of them), which I put in a huge tank with water fountain and aquatic plants. It has been a week there, and I think they are doing quite well. I have been feeding them with "feeder goldfish".

I would like to know, how sensitive are RBP with respect to water condition? I am planning to buy an aquarium, and moving them into the aquarium, hence I would like to know what equipments do I need with the new aquarium.

BTW, how often should I change the water?

Pls give me your expert opinion on what equipment should I get, what size tank. etc....

Thank you in advance....
 

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In my experience, RBP are very hardy when it comes to water conditions; you can put them in de-chlorinated tap water in a tank with a heater and they will survive but I dont personally endorse this. I have been forced into that exact situation before for a limited amount of time so therefore I know.
The deal here though is that as we are all keen hobbyists on here we want the best for our fish otherwise whats the point eh?
I have recently bought a second tank : 78 Gallon and am setting it up right now. I recommend an external cannister filter for the pure diversity, power and efficiency; something like a Fluval 404, Eheim 2324 or the like, but this all depends on your tank size. The relevant websites have tables to illustrate which of their models are most suitable for the different sizes of tank.
Heater is of course essential, one with a thermostat and clear adjustment displays, again you will find the information regarding the correct power for your size tank on their sites, a tip though is to buy two if you can that amount to more than the adequate power incase your fish destroy one! Higher up the line of afore mentioned filters you will find 'Professional External Filters with integrated heaters; not totally necessary but will allow less clutter in your tank.
Cycling your tank is a must, this is easily viable through 'start up kits' which contain all of the treatments/additives and usually a test kit to diagnose the state of your cycle; testing mainly Nitrate, Ammonia and Ph levels. If you do not have an understanding of the Nitrogen Cycle then these kits will explain everything also there is a vast wealth of information on these sites.
I undertake a 20% water change weekly-fortnightly as a rule but a consistent test of your water will dictate your actions.
Returning to your original question though; Piranha are one of the most tolerant tropical fish to my knowledge and I wish you good fortune and all the rewards that keeping piranha bring.
 

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Skellon said:
In my experience, RBP are very hardy when it comes to water conditions; you can put them in de-chlorinated tap water in a tank with a heater and they will survive but I dont personally endorse this. I have been forced into that exact situation before for a limited amount of time so therefore I know.
The deal here though is that as we are all keen hobbyists on here we want the best for our fish otherwise whats the point eh?
I have recently bought a second tank : 78 Gallon and am setting it up right now. I recommend an external cannister filter for the pure diversity, power and efficiency; something like a Fluval 404, Eheim 2324 or the like, but this all depends on your tank size. The relevant websites have tables to illustrate which of their models are most suitable for the different sizes of tank.
Heater is of course essential, one with a thermostat and clear adjustment displays, again you will find the information regarding the correct power for your size tank on their sites, a tip though is to buy two if you can that amount to more than the adequate power incase your fish destroy one! Higher up the line of afore mentioned filters you will find 'Professional External Filters with integrated heaters; not totally necessary but will allow less clutter in your tank.
Cycling your tank is a must, this is easily viable through 'start up kits' which contain all of the treatments/additives and usually a test kit to diagnose the state of your cycle; testing mainly Nitrate, Ammonia and Ph levels. If you do not have an understanding of the Nitrogen Cycle then these kits will explain everything also there is a vast wealth of information on these sites.
I undertake a 20% water change weekly-fortnightly as a rule but a consistent test of your water will dictate your actions.
Returning to your original question though; Piranha are one of the most tolerant tropical fish to my knowledge and I wish you good fortune and all the rewards that keeping piranha bring.
And dont forget.....ph must be at 6.5/7, they are acid, and bigger tank...bigger fish
 

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Well written yes but I tend to disagree with you Mathiotte.Piranha while they do tend to come from various whitwater and blackwater habitats varying in acidity.Most if not all piranha will adjust to your local water conditions whether it is on the acidic side or alkaline side.My water here is rather hard and has a PH of 8.0 and I've successfully kept 27 species of piranha and have bred Pygocentus Nattereri,Serrasalmus Spilopluera cf and Serrasalmus Spilopluera gold's.I'm sure PH adjustments can be made if so desired but it really isn't needed.After keeping piranha for 23 years I have had no problems keeping them in hard high PH water.
 
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