Piranhas Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,223 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does most of the nitrifying bacteria reside in the water, gravel, or filter media? If the latter is correct, is it possible to transition a filter which has been running on a fully cycled tank to a non-cycled tank and expect it to keep up? I am pretty sure the answer is the bacteria is everywhere and no you cant do this....just wondering.
 

·
Death is fair to everyone.
Joined
·
5,310 Posts
If the bioload is not to much it can. Alot of the nitrifying bacteria resides in the gravel too. If you can add some of that too it will help. You can also use biospira. (I know there are people who doubt a overnight solution will work. But my piraya tank was only running 2 days before they went in. And they were in excellent health.) It is nitrifying bacteria in a bag. I have used it on two of my new tanks. And used right it works. It helps new filters and gravel overnight. It has worked very well i checked perimeters daily after adding. And all were excellent. Oh and very little bacteria resides in the water.
 
G

·
I would say most bacteria lives in the filter and gravel bed.

when setting up any new tanks I usually use a well used sponge filter and gravel.

another good reason to run a sponge filter
 

·
Hello Everybody!
Joined
·
2,049 Posts
In order for nitrifiers to colonize in great numbers, certain criteria must first be met. 1) Must have a flow of water high in dissolved oxygen. 2) Must have a constant food source... ammonia/nitrite. 3) Must have a suitable media to colonize (gravel, sponge, any other bio media).

Since nitrifiers are not free-floating/swimming, we can rule out that water would be a suitable media. Thus, they are not found in great numbers in water.

So unless you have an undergravel filter which basically draws a current through the gravel to satisfy these 3 criteria, nitrifiers only occur near the surface of the gravel bed. This holds true for any surface in the tank (glass walls, ornaments, driftwood, plants, etc.). These places will have a certain number of nitrifiers colonize because water flows through them... lack of which would encourage anaerobic activity.

That being said, the ideal place for nitrifiers to reside is in your filter bed. That's where the majority of your nitrifiers will colonize because it satisfies all 3 criteria (oxygen, food, and media). So basically, you can cycle a new tank (with a minor stumble in your ammonia/nitrite readings) if you use a seasoned filter. The minor stumble is caused by: 1) water parameters can never be exactly the same as the old tank water, thus nitrifiers would need to adjust. 2) you are still missing nitrifiers that were present in the old tank's glass walls, gravel, ornaments, etc.

Short answer to sum up this long rant... you CAN use a seasoned filter to significantly reduce cycling time. Just make sure to not overfeed and overstock your tank so the nitrifiers can keep up.
 

·
Death is fair to everyone.
Joined
·
5,310 Posts
Great post don. Good to see you have your props
This guy and hareball have alot of experiece
These two guys in this fourum is going to be a great information center.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,223 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the answers guys. Thats pretty much what I thought. I was asking this question to see whether I could pre-cycle my filters because I am moving out soon and setting up more tanks...
 

·
OPEFE
Joined
·
10,249 Posts
100% agree with DonH post!
 

·
The ASSMAN
Joined
·
20,469 Posts
Hey X,
When I set up a 45, I used a precycled emp440 that I had for quite a while on my 125 with my pygos. I filled the 45 about 2/3 up with water from the 125 and the rest with new water, slapped on the filter and put in a 5" spilo and some feeders. I checked the paramaters for a few days and it is completely cycled. Never had any ammonia or nitrites.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top