Piranhas Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
5 TIME CHAMPS
Joined
·
19,142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
bobme had me thinking on his march8 thread.are we the only life in this galaxy?are there a such thing as aliens?what do you think?
 

·
...just back for a bit to catch up...
Joined
·
6,193 Posts
i think there are aliens out there in the world, after all, how do explain bobme
.....on a serious note, i believe there truly is intelligent life out there....im still trying to figure out stonehenge and the easter island heads
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,692 Posts
Yup, there must be intelligent life around somewhere - I refuse to believe we're the only intelligent (well... intelligent?) beings in the entire universe.
Perhaps aliens have spotted us centuries ago, but fleed in blind terror after observing us humans for a while
 

·
joey'd is da man
Joined
·
14,077 Posts
I believe their are aliens, but they are most probbably so far away we will never have contact.
But the universe is so big and their are so many planets that it would be quite strange if this planet is the only one where life has evolved.
 

·
"The Dancing Banana Man"
Joined
·
7,760 Posts
Judazzz said:
I'm just wondering: I know NASA has some rocks from Mars with supposed fossilised remains of microscopic lifeforms, but as far as I know that was never substanciated......
The most important result for the detection of life came not from the biology experiment, but from the GCMS. It found no trace of any organic compound on the surface of Mars. Organic compounds are known to be present in space (for example, in meteorites), so this result came as a complete surprise. The GCMS was definitely working, however, because it was able to detect traces of the cleaning solvents that had been used to sterilize it prior to launch.
The total absence of organic material on the surface made the results of the biology experiments moot, since metabolism involving organic compounds were what those experiments were designed to detect. However, the results from the biology experiments were sufficiently confusing to be worth examining.

To reduce the chance of false positives, the biology experiments not only had to detect life in a soil sample, they had to fail to detect it in another soil sample that had been heat-sterilized (the control sample). Had terrestrial life been tested with the Viking biology instrument, the following results would have been expected:

response for response for
sample heat-sterilized control

GEX oxygen or CO2 emitted none
LR labeled gas emitted none
PR carbon detected none

If life was completely absent from Mars, as the GCMS results suggested, these should have been the results from the biology experiments:

response for response for
sample heat-sterilized control

GEX none none
LR none none
PR none none

In highly simplified form, these were the actual results from Mars:

response for response for
sample heat-sterilized control

GEX oxygen emitted oxygen emitted
LR labeled gas emitted none
PR carbon detected carbon detected

The fact that both the GEX and PR experiments produced positive results even with the control sample indicates that non-biological processes are at work. Subsequent laboratory experiments on Earth demonstrated that highly-reactive oxidizing compounds (oxides or superoxides) in the soil would, when exposed to water, produce hydrogen peroxide. Oxidized iron, such as maghemite, could act as a catalyst to produce the results seen by the PR experiment.
Only the LR experiment appears to have met the criteria for life detection, and it does this rather ambiguously. When the nutrient was first injected, there was a rapid increase in the amount of labeled gas emitted. Subsequent injections of nutrient caused the amount of gas to decrease initially (which is surprising if biological processes were at work) but then to increase slowly. No response was seen in the control sample sterilized at the highest temperature (160C, 320F.) While there is still some controversy, the consensus opinion is that the LR results can also be explained non-biologically.

Extinct Life
Most researchers now believe that the results of the Viking biology experiments can explained by purely chemical processes that do not require the presence of life, and the GCMS results completely rule out life in any event. Thus, there is no detectable life at the two Viking landing sites, which were widely separated and different in character (the Viking 2 landing site was specifically chosen because of its high latitude, since it was closer to polar water sources.) While the possibility of "oases" of more favorable conditions for life cannot be eliminated, for example in subsurface permafrost layers or in geothermal vents near volcanoes, the chances that life exists on Mars at the present time do not seem good.
However, we have seen evidence that Mars may have been significantly wetter, perhaps with a denser atmosphere, earlier in its history. If so, there is the possibility that life arose on Mars, only to die out as conditions on the planet worsened. Therefore, some researchers have suggested that future searches for life on Mars be shifted to focus on extinct, rather than extant, life.

On Earth, such extinct life can be found in the form of microfossils and stromatolites. Such forms, as found in western Australia, are the oldest evidence of life on Earth, dating from 3.5 billion years ago. Microfossils are individual fossilized organisms (typically algae), as much as a few millimeters in diameter. Stromatolites are formed when layers of microbial organisms in shallow lakes or pools are covered with sediments. The organisms migrate toward the light after being covered, and the remaining organic material forms a characteristic layered or domed structure.

Stromatolites are important because they may be large enough to be seen by lander (or perhaps even high-resolution orbiter) cameras, and so some researchers have suggested searching for them near features that appear to be ancient lakes or bays. While definitive proof of biological origin would require microscopic imaging or sample return, the discovery of such features would lend credibility to the idea of extinct life.

Conclusions
The question of whether life is common or rare in the universe has deep philosophical implications. It is uncertain exactly how life arose on Earth, so it is difficult to determine how common such mechanisms are. But if life also arose on Mars, this would show that those mechanisms operated not just once, but twice, arguing that life may well be common elsewhere.
However, the search for life on Mars thus far has been unsuccessful. Some portion of the scientific community feels that further searches are a waste of time, while another portion remains neutral or guardedly optimistic. In principle, it's simple to prove that there is life on Mars -- all one need do is find an example. Proving there isn't life on Mars is much harder. Even a prolonged negative search can be countered with the suggestion of yet another, more inaccessible place in which to look.

In the case of Mars, the issue has been complicated by the emotional belief in an Earthlike Mars, which has largely been shown to have been a myth. Mars is a spectacular place, and will remain so even if it is finally proved to be lifeless. Today, we don't know for sure if there is or ever was life on Mars. But one thing is certain -- one day, there will be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,223 Posts
I think the aliens people see are real yet they are the future human beings coming back in time to genetically change us to their advantage. I think the little gray men are human beings evolved millions of years past a nuclear holocaust.
 

·
...just back for a bit to catch up...
Joined
·
6,193 Posts
The most important result for the detection of life came not from the biology experiment, but from the GCMS. It found no trace of any organic compound on the surface of Mars. Organic compounds are known to be present in space (for example, in meteorites), so this result came as a complete surprise. The GCMS was definitely working, however, because it was able to detect traces of the cleaning solvents that had been used to sterilize it prior to launch.
The total absence of organic material on the surface made the results of the biology experiments moot, since metabolism involving organic compounds were what those experiments were designed to detect. However, the results from the biology experiments were sufficiently confusing to be worth examining.

To reduce the chance of false positives, the biology experiments not only had to detect life in a soil sample, they had to fail to detect it in another soil sample that had been heat-sterilized (the control sample). Had terrestrial life been tested with the Viking biology instrument, the following results would have been expected:

response for response for
sample heat-sterilized control

GEX oxygen or CO2 emitted none
LR labeled gas emitted none
PR carbon detected none

If life was completely absent from Mars, as the GCMS results suggested, these should have been the results from the biology experiments:

response for response for
sample heat-sterilized control

GEX none none
LR none none
PR none none

In highly simplified form, these were the actual results from Mars:

response for response for
sample heat-sterilized control

GEX oxygen emitted oxygen emitted
LR labeled gas emitted none
PR carbon detected carbon detected

The fact that both the GEX and PR experiments produced positive results even with the control sample indicates that non-biological processes are at work. Subsequent laboratory experiments on Earth demonstrated that highly-reactive oxidizing compounds (oxides or superoxides) in the soil would, when exposed to water, produce hydrogen peroxide. Oxidized iron, such as maghemite, could act as a catalyst to produce the results seen by the PR experiment.
Only the LR experiment appears to have met the criteria for life detection, and it does this rather ambiguously. When the nutrient was first injected, there was a rapid increase in the amount of labeled gas emitted. Subsequent injections of nutrient caused the amount of gas to decrease initially (which is surprising if biological processes were at work) but then to increase slowly. No response was seen in the control sample sterilized at the highest temperature (160C, 320F.) While there is still some controversy, the consensus opinion is that the LR results can also be explained non-biologically.

Extinct Life
Most researchers now believe that the results of the Viking biology experiments can explained by purely chemical processes that do not require the presence of life, and the GCMS results completely rule out life in any event. Thus, there is no detectable life at the two Viking landing sites, which were widely separated and different in character (the Viking 2 landing site was specifically chosen because of its high latitude, since it was closer to polar water sources.) While the possibility of "oases" of more favorable conditions for life cannot be eliminated, for example in subsurface permafrost layers or in geothermal vents near volcanoes, the chances that life exists on Mars at the present time do not seem good.
However, we have seen evidence that Mars may have been significantly wetter, perhaps with a denser atmosphere, earlier in its history. If so, there is the possibility that life arose on Mars, only to die out as conditions on the planet worsened. Therefore, some researchers have suggested that future searches for life on Mars be shifted to focus on extinct, rather than extant, life.

On Earth, such extinct life can be found in the form of microfossils and stromatolites. Such forms, as found in western Australia, are the oldest evidence of life on Earth, dating from 3.5 billion years ago. Microfossils are individual fossilized organisms (typically algae), as much as a few millimeters in diameter. Stromatolites are formed when layers of microbial organisms in shallow lakes or pools are covered with sediments. The organisms migrate toward the light after being covered, and the remaining organic material forms a characteristic layered or domed structure.

Stromatolites are important because they may be large enough to be seen by lander (or perhaps even high-resolution orbiter) cameras, and so some researchers have suggested searching for them near features that appear to be ancient lakes or bays. While definitive proof of biological origin would require microscopic imaging or sample return, the discovery of such features would lend credibility to the idea of extinct life.

Conclusions
The question of whether life is common or rare in the universe has deep philosophical implications. It is uncertain exactly how life arose on Earth, so it is difficult to determine how common such mechanisms are. But if life also arose on Mars, this would show that those mechanisms operated not just once, but twice, arguing that life may well be common elsewhere.
However, the search for life on Mars thus far has been unsuccessful. Some portion of the scientific community feels that further searches are a waste of time, while another portion remains neutral or guardedly optimistic. In principle, it's simple to prove that there is life on Mars -- all one need do is find an example. Proving there isn't life on Mars is much harder. Even a prolonged negative search can be countered with the suggestion of yet another, more inaccessible place in which to look.

In the case of Mars, the issue has been complicated by the emotional belief in an Earthlike Mars, which has largely been shown to have been a myth. Mars is a spectacular place, and will remain so even if it is finally proved to be lifeless. Today, we don't know for sure if there is or ever was life on Mars. But one thing is certain -- one day, there will be.
....if only he can translate all this into english, i think the rest of us would follow
(the hell is GEX, LR, PR) ....however, i still respect his interest about life in other galaxies/planet, he just reminds me of a narrator on the discovery channel


If the the universe is infinitly expanding then there is other life...
....i have a question about this expanding universe theory...
lets say that an ordinary rubber band represents our universe...if we stretch out the rubber band as much as we can, to simulate the expanding universe theory, wouldn't the rubber band snap in the middle, concluding that the universe will collapse onto itself, killing everything?

I think the aliens people see are real yet they are the future human beings coming back in time to genetically change us to their advantage. I think the little gray men are human beings evolved millions of years past a nuclear holocaust.
couldn't they find a better method of genetically changing us instead of using the probing method on our women and cows?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
there is life outside of this planet, we have astronaugts that leave this earth all the time and they are not on this planet they are in outter space and they are living...
... I think there is and in a scary way I would want to be abducted, but none of that probing stuff, just a friendly visit or something
 

·
...just back for a bit to catch up...
Joined
·
6,193 Posts
SnowCichlid said:
there is life outside of this planet, we have astronaugts that leave this earth all the time and they are not on this planet they are in outter space and they are living...
... I think there is and in a scary way I would want to be abducted, but none of that probing stuff, just a friendly visit or something
and after they artificially inseminate you, you can invite them to a keg party and tell them "it's a boy!"
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top