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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
today i went to check on my snake, and i saw what must have been regurgitated food because it was way bigger than his turds and it was the color of a pinkie. it did not look like a pinkie it was about 1.5 inches (just a guess, i didn't measure the nasty thinkg) and looked kind of like a hot dog. i read that it is common for babies to regurgitate when they get too cold but the temp on the warm side is about 82 degrees so i know he is warm enough. i just want to know why he did this and what i can do to prevent it from happening.
 

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Did you handle him after you fed him? Stressful activity such as handling can make them regurge, best to wait a couple of days.

-PK
 

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~ATLANTA BRAVES~
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What kind of snake is this? Your Corn?

Its best not to handle your snake for a couple days after a feeding so you dont disrupt their digestion.
 
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All of the regurgitations I see occur when I fed a snake that was too cold.

Perhaps 82 degrees isn't warm enough. How is the heat being transferred and how are you measuring it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i have a heating pad underneath and a heat lamp on top. he rarely goes to the warm side. im not sure why though he needs warmth to digest his food.
 

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im not sure why though he needs warmth to digest his food.
Because reptiles are cold blooded, it means that they cannot generate the temperatures needed for the enzymes to digest their food. In order to reach the optimum temperature for the enzymes they need to absorb heat from their environment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
oh yeah i knew that heh.. i just forgot to put a comma between though and he.

Im not sure why though, he needs warmth to digest his food
 

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C.D. said:
oh yeah i knew that heh.. i just forgot to put a comma between though and he.

Im not sure why though, he needs warmth to digest his food
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because in colder temperatures these enzymes needed to digest their food arent present. Well im not sure if they arent present or if their numbers arent suffcient to breakdown the food properly? In any case, these enzymes require heat
 

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because in colder temperatures these enzymes needed to digest their food arent present. Well im not sure if they arent present or if their numbers arent suffcient to breakdown the food properly? In any case, these enzymes require heat
The enzymes would be there, and they will allways be there. If the temperature is too low, the enzymes and molecules in the food have little kinetic energy. this means that they come into contact with eachother rarely and enzyme/substrate complexes are rarely formed.

As the temperature rises, the molecules gain more energy and are bumping into eachother all the time. This means enzyme/substrate complexes are formed very often, and the substrate molecules in the food are broken down quickly.

As the temperature gets even hotter the enzymes stop working completey, and are ruined. To understand why, you need to know that enzymes are just protiens. Protiens are just strings of amino acids joined together. This long string is all tangled and twisted in a precise way. These twists are all held in place by hydrogen and di-sulphide bonds. As the temperature rises, the atoms making up the protiens gain energy and literally shake these intramolecular bonds apart. This means that the structure of the protien/enzyme has changed and the substrate can no longer fit into the active site of the enzyme, and the food will not be digested.

All enzymes have an "optimum temperature" which is where the temperature is high enough for enzyme/substrate complexes to be fored quickly, but just below the temperature which causes to bonds to break and the enzyme becomes denatured. It is this optimum temperature which the snake is looking to obtain when thermoregulating.

The action of enzymes also explains why reptiles become more active as they warm up. Respiration is an enzymes controlled reaction, so they need warmth to convert carbohydrates into ATP. ATP is used in body tissues as a source of energy.

there, thats my bit of science done for the day.
don't you love biology!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
my snake has a warm side and a cool side but even after he eats he still stays on the cool side. i have tried many different ways to coax him to the warm side with causing minimal stress. i use a uth and heat lamp. i woner if he just doesn't like the light or what his deal is. but he just stays on the cool side where he can't digest and then he throws it up.

its times like these when animals and humans could communicate so i could figure out what his or my problems are so i could just make him as happy as possible.
 

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is there anywhere for it to hide in the warm end?

what is the temperature of the cool end?

what is the size of the food ond what is the size of the snake?

could it be the stress of you trying to move it to the warm end that is making it puke?

how often are you feeding it?

is it shitting ok when it manages to keep something down?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
there is a place to hid on the warm end and place to hide on the cool end. i thought maybe he just liked the cool side hide better so i moved it to the warm side and the warm hide to the cool side.

the temp of the cool end is about 74 degrees.

he is fed frozen pinkies.(thawed out of course) and he is approx. 13-15 inches long( i haven't measured him yet because i am trying to reduce some stress before i feed him again. but he looks a couple inches longer than a ruler so i just guesstimate)

it may be me moving things around to try to get him to the hot side. but i don't touch him.

i have had him for about 2 weeks now and i fed him last tuesday and he threw it up on thursday.

when i first got him the reptile guy at the pet store said that he fed him the day before. so when i got him home he crapped about three times and then regurgitated. Then about 3 days later, i fed him again and he crapped once and then regurgitated. and since he regurgitated he crapped a pile about half the size of his usual crap pile/puddle
 

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Ahh, then I think we have found your problem!!

The white stuff is infact urea and not feces at all. Urea is like our urine, but things happen differently in reptiles. The fact that the fecal matter is runny could be a sign of internal problems. Your best bet would be to take the snake to see a vet, along with a fecal sample if possible.
 
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