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Identifying The Male And The Female?

I have tried to contact Jean Francois Helias recently, but the one who replied was surprisingly the person who runs Snakehead.org website. He is a very good friend of Jean Francois Helias, and since Jean had gone out into the wilderness, he had asked the person who runs the Snakehead.org to answer me.

So what I have got to know is that identifying the sex is very difficult because there is no evident dimorphism. Sex dimorphism until now is only valid when it comes to the smaller ( mostly Indian) mouth-brooding species such as the C. Gachua, C. Orientalis, Stewartii and so on. Sex dimorphism is not known for the nest building species as the Channa Micropeltes or the Giant Snakehead. Sexual maturity of C. Micropeltes is starting from the size of 1.5-2 ft ( 2 years ). In a juvenile state it is absolutely impossible. Until now nobody could deliver a perfect sized tank to breed C. Micropeltes. Cemented tanks of 10 feet is the size with which it works to breed them. Snakeheads are monogamous fish, i.e. the build couples staying together for the rest of their lives.

And a couple is identified when juveniles are put together where the couple turns out to be a rumble fish, defending their territory. Hope this helps
 

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Identifying The Male And The Female?

I have tried to contact Jean Francois Helias recently, but the one who replied was surprisingly the person who runs Snakehead.org website. He is a very good friend of Jean Francois Helias, and since Jean had gone out into the wilderness, he had asked the person who runs the Snakehead.org to answer me.

So what I have got to know is that identifying the sex is very difficult because there is no evident dimorphism. Sex dimorphism until now is only valid when it comes to the smaller ( mostly Indian) mouth-brooding species such as the C. gachua, C. orientalis, stewartii and so on. Sex dimorphism is not known for the nest building species as the Channa Micropeltes or the Giant Snakehead. Sexual maturity of C. micropeltes is starting from the size of 1.5-2 ft ( 2 years ). In a juvenile state it is absolutely impossible. Until now nobody could deliver a perfect sized tank to breed C. micropeltes. Cemented tanks of 10 feet is the size with which it works to breed them. Snakeheads are monogamous fish, i.e. the build couples staying together for the rest of their lives.

And a couple is identified when juveniles are put together where the couple turns out to be a rumble fish, defending their territory. Hope this helps
This will be a nice addition to your piece of information


There are no apparent sexual differences. The fish must be over 600 mm in length before sexing is even possible. The male is distinguished by the small differences in the placement of the sexual organs on the underside of the fish. To do this the fish must be anaesthetised and this should be only carried out by persons whom have had training in this procedure
 

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I have read you mentioning this in one of your posts, now I remember again..thank you so much for this information. Hmm, the problem is that I hope the two Giant Snakeheads that I am going to buy will be both males or females..yes, same sex. I am not ready for it if they are both male and female. It won't be easy to be taken care of...everything they need must be provided, like weedy areas for them to build their nest, who knows what their nest would look like, food, plus a tank must be big enough for this, a pond would be a better idea..and their aggressiveness, ah..I'll see what I can do. But if it happens, then I will just have to do what I have to do for them. Yes, it's not just about wanting them but also being responsible.
 

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just want to take a moment and thank you "silence" for your contribution to this forum..excellent post,articles and photos...*rockon*
 

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That's right Jan, thanks to whoever took those pictures. And thePACK, you are welcome, informations, articles, pictures and videos regarding The Giant Snakehead is limited out there, I think websites regarding Snakehead terror is a lot more than those decent Snakehead fish keeping websites. I am just trying to get to know all I can about them and pouring it out wherever I think is best to, we are all learning. Some people would keep their knowledge etc to themselves since not many know about them, but hey we are all Snakehead fans only we can understand each other. The love we have for the predator and the hunger to know about them, I understand this. Plus, seeing people who do not know about them judging them, for an example like saying the Cobra Snakehead is more aggressive and longer than the Giant Snakehead, Snakeheads are overrated predators, news about Giant Snakehead attacking humans are jokes etc, hmm it's time to let them know they have no idea what they're talking about!
 

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Lol Jan, speaking of the Giant Snakehead's jumping techniques, I am sure both of you have experienced it. It sure is unbelievable, there are stories of Giant Snakeheads jumping out of the lake or standing river snapping any small animals that are close to the lake or river. And they would then 'walk' back into their home. My experience, obviously happened when cleaning the tank. They never jumped when they were in the tank, maybe once or twice trying to catch a wall lizard out of nowhere hiding in the tank lid.

When cleaning the tank, we would reduce the water until it is half just so they could swim and take them out with a fish net, one at a time. But we would also have thick newspapers closing on the net so they do not jump out or fall off as they wiggle and those beatings they gave against the thick news papers was powerful, and was a pain in the ass, knocking and knocking, for just being a small boy, my mom helped me with it, and I know how frustrated she would be. She would try to catch as me getting ready with the thick newspapers and close on it and grab it hard so the Giant Snakehead did not beat my hands off. We would almost have had a shower. The taking them out and back into the tank would seem like forever! but I enjoyed the action.

So once, one of the two jumped out of the pail that we placed them into. So fast, it jumped almost 6 feet from the pail and slithered right under the couch, and its eyes were looking here and there as if checking its new environment. I had to be on my hands and knees trying to reach it but couldn't. My mom then arrived and just pushed it out, grabbed it which took her awhile because it was slippery, moving its head and tail from side to side which made it move forward, and she then put it back into the pail.

The one that died as a juvenile, which was the biggest, 6 or 6.5cm...can't recall, was from jumping while cleaning the tank too. I had placed them in a small plastic tank at the back of my house when they were small, it fell from the 13th floor of my apartment. Just about 4cm or so from falling, but by moving its head and tail from side to side, 'walking'..it fell before I managed to stop it, I remember touching it, trying to get a hold, oh yes slippery it was. It hit someone's balcony before falling onto the ground, that was a sad experience. Damn I miss them..can't wait to have Giant Snakeheads again. And here is a picture of a beautiful Giant Snakehead showing its powerful tail!
And if you see its face, it looks different than the rest you have seen here. It is obviously an individual thing, every face has its difference. So if you have a favourite face, observing them before buying would help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Giant Snakeheads caught in Singapore. Gorgeous Micropeltes, orange-gold, grey, purple, black, golden..wow!
 

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to awesome of a thread and posts(so much info and excellent photos)...this is a must pinned thread..
 

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I know some people believe that the Giant Snakehead is an overrated predator which I believe is untrue. I would say these people are talking without truly knowing this predator.
Yep it doesn't seem any worse than a gatorgar. And it stays a lot smaller too.
 

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I would like to mention that when they hit around 26-27"", they eat alot. Understandably, of course.

I just tryed chicken breasts. This works really well. About 1/2 lb ($1.25) every day. Keeps water very clean(Never actually hits water).
rw
 

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I know some people believe that the Giant Snakehead is an overrated predator which I believe is untrue. I would say these people are talking without truly knowing this predator.
Yep it doesn't seem any worse than a gatorgar. And it stays a lot smaller too.
Smaller than an Alligator Gar, yes and not worse than it, I disagree. An Alligator Gar is not designed to be faster and to be able to kill more than a Giant Snakehead is able to. I have read reports of Alligator Gars attacking humans, but the attacks happened due to the people on boats having their legs hanging outside into the water, moving and playing, where it was said that these people had displayed themselves as fish or any smaller animals moving on the surface. There were experiences to support this statement when swimmers had dived into lakes that had giant Alligator Gars.

But the Giant Snakeheads, humans or what, it attacks. Of course, what I have said above certainly cannot judge this awesome prehistoric-looking predator the Alligator Gar. But a Giant Snakehead in my opinion is definitely more vicious, aggressive and meaner than an Alligator Gar, Alligator Gar isn't actually seen as an aggressive predator, but just a big fish that feeds on other fish and small mammals. A Giant Snakehead is definitely more equipped in being a perfect killing machine than an Alligator Gar is which is too slow compared to the Giant Snakehead with a jaw that cannot aim preys as perfectly as the Giant Snakehead that has stereoscopic vision or better front views which is what a perfect predator comes with unlike the Alligator Gar with its eyes on the sides. A same sized Alligator Gar and Giant Snakehead being put together, the Giant Snakehead has far better chances to win. Alligator Gars are magnificent but sadly they aren't treated fairly, they are abused, killed, jaws broken and thrown back into the water to starve to death, being called trash fish, that is not good for food and fishing..just sad, ridiculous and cruel..


Back to topic now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
BraveHeart, just look at them, congratulations, how amazing, they are so beautiful, love their colouration! they look very healthy, perfect! thank you so much for the picture, more picture please!


And just look at this picture of Giant Snakehead, caught in Malaysia, what a monster!
 

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Things That Cause The Micropeltes To Jump.

As we have many times heard and seen, the Channa Micropeltes ( pronounced as my-crow-pell-tease ) is just an excellent jumper, it is not a surprise that it becomes such a pain in the ass. Waking up one day to take a look at your Micropeltes as usual only to find it dead on the floor is something that Channa lovers sometimes often experience. Micropeltes have many times risked their own life due to their own attitude. But being a hardy fish that is able to survive on land up to a period of time, many have found their Micropeltes laying on the floor still alive and when approached it tries to move away as if it is a fish that lives on land. Or sometimes it just remains dry and frozen if it had been outside for too long but when put into the tank, it swims just fine as if nothing happened. But then some have died after awhile, but I would say it is more to the consequence of the impact being made to their body from falling onto the floor, unless it was outside for just too long and is left unnoticed.

As I have mentioned, one of my juvenile Micropeltes had jumped out of the tank while cleaning and eventually fell from the 13th floor of my apartment. When I found it, to my surprise it had some movement to its body but that was it, I took it in my hand and I could feel that its bones seemed shattered inside..it broke my heart. I have been told by one of my cousin brothers that his friend's adult Micropeltes had jumped out of his apartment which was from the 3rd floor, believe it or not, when it was taken and put back into the tank, the Micropeltes was fine! but sadly it died later. This shows what a powerful predator the Micropeltes is.

Now to the reasons, why does a Micropeltes jump out of its tank? There are many reasons to it, first it is due to the water condition, if the water is not cleaned for such a long period of time ( though they can survive in dirty water for being an air-breather ) and the Micropeltes being seldom fed or less fed, their natural instinct is to leave the inhospital water to search for a better place and to find enough food supply. But please keep in mind that Micropeltes does not require clean water all the time, some Micropeltes keepers often cleaning the tank water does lead to fatalities and then wonder what was wrong. Micropeltes is a hardy fish, and being a piscivorous predator does get the tank dirty but a good filtration will help, unless it is obvious that the water is dirty and does require cleaning, just don't go up to it releasing an unpleasent smell. It is about how you maintain its diet, just don't leave any dead feeders or food in there if it didn't eat. And if you see the water being cloudy quickly, take your time because many times the water goes back to being clear, especially with a filtration. Besides, the tank itself being small is another reason to jump out in order to find a better bigger place, they are amazing survivors. But some Micropeltes have just remained in the small tank, often laying, not moving as it continues to grow, could barely turn and finally being deformed.

But then what if it still jumps even after you have done all of the above and even more than what I have mentioned? Remember that Micropeltes has an attitude of travelling its environment, well just keep the tank lid closed, but this isn't safe when adults have knocked it open before falling onto the floor. If my Micropeltes does this, I would have made a lock for the lid or just place something heavy enough on it. But forgive me because bad things still happen as you can see what has happened to the Micropeltes that was observing the kitty. Micropeltes can jump too fast and too strongly which they often do only to cause such a thing to their ownself. But how did this happen? Because of that kitty named Fred, yes make sure you do not have things especially small animals moving around, especially close to your Micropeltes tank. In this case, the owner would hear splashes of water everytime the cat moves closer, trying to eat it. And when it has jumped out, the cat would run away. Just look how close that is...and though the final picture has been posted on the first page, it is to show that it died due to jumping out of the tank.

And what has happened to these Micropeltes is not what any keepers would want to experience, I hope the owner had taken the deformed Micropeltes to an animal doctor. And finally be careful when standing in front of the tank, opening the lid, especially when putting your hand in there because they do jump to strike even the owners themselves and are so known to have bitten their owners' fingers off. Micropeltes is so aware of their environment, you may see them just laying at the bottom or staying still at subsurface of the water but their eyes staring at you, moving wherever you move. Or just follows whatever moves in front of them and even try to attack it, which has made the adults to break tank glasses. It is not uncommon to hear adult Micropeltes keepers to have changed tanks a few times just because of that. Micropeltes is a very sensitive predator, so keepers are advised to be very careful, to take care, to be concerned and be very patient. They are such a wonderful animal.
 
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