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Should be ok - I mean, if those millions that have to bust their asses day in, day out just to survive, want more money, they can always get a second job...
 

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Peace....Through Superior Firepower
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Judazzz said:
Should be ok - I mean, if those millions that have to bust their asses day in, day out just to survive, want more money, they can always get a second job...

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I dont understand where we even get all this money .....??

Arent we in debt anyway?

Dont we have to have the gold to back our money's value up ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
^gold no longer backs up all the money, and bush will "hope" to get funds from cutting programs...yet he wont face reality that taxes have to be raised to properly pay off debts.
 

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Filo said:
So do you wanna give 80 more billion towards Iraq...hmmm I dont.

(no article posted, cus everytime i post an article, i get bitched at)

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Can't really stop now, if 80 billion will help the situation (doubtful) its worth it.
PacmanXSA said:
Just wait till the US attacks Iran


Pac
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I don't see that happening, look for Israel to strike and the world to clean the mess up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
PacmanXSA said:
Just wait till the US attacks Iran


Pac
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its funny how we are stetched thin, yet we are picking on north korea and iran...
 

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Speaking of NK, Anyone heard the theory that China should invade North Korea? ..Interesting.
 

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Well its more of an article, I don't know the ccredibility of the article.

By BRUCE GILLEY
January 6, 2005; Page A16

A new Asia director at the National Security Council offers the chance for some fresh thinking on North Korea. Victor Cha, who assumed the post last month, is a scholar and policy analyst who will bring a hard-nosed approach to the issue. Mr. Cha has long advocated that Washington and Beijing work more closely to turn up the heat on Pyongyang. But such plans have so far always foundered on China's reluctance to become more involved in trying to end North Korea's nuclear programs.

So here is an immodest proposal that could reduce global tensions, bring justice to millions, and cement China's emergence as a great power: Beijing should invade North Korea on humanitarian grounds and establish a China-backed transitional regime there. The U.S. and its allies in Asia should provide diplomatic and logistical support to the operation, while the U.N. should provide its legal blessing.

Seldom has there been a regime more deserving of being overthrown on humanitarian grounds. North Korea is one of the great disasters of our time. A famine from 1995 to 1998 killed between 600,000 and one million people -- 4% of the population. Even today a third of the population is malnourished. Basic rights simply do not exist. All of this is because of a cruel and unreformed communist regime that makes Saddam's Iraq look like a paragon of justice. As if these humanitarian considerations were not enough, North Korea's nuclear programs pose a major threat to world peace and raise the specter of proliferation of WMD. So too do its biological and chemical-weapons programs, which have so far received far less international attention. In short, there is a firm basis for a just war to topple Kim Jong Il.

It is not a war that the U.S. and its Western allies can wage for several reasons, not least that their militaries are now fully committed in Iraq and Afghanistan. Nor do Japan or South Korea have the will or the means to take on the task. Indeed, their foreign ministers agreed in mid-December to focus their efforts on China's leverage with Pyongyang. That leaves China as the only country with the military capacity and national interest to do the job: It is Beijing's sphere of influence that Pyongyang is destabilizing with its nuclear adventurism. Nor is it in Beijing's interest to have a crumbling regime as its neighbor, as evidenced by the continual embarrassments over how to deal with a flood of starving refugees.

A People's Liberation Army-led invasion could be a clean-cut affair. It would not require passing through other countries, or even using their territory as support centers. China's experience with the ethnic Korean autonomous regions in Manchuria would give it an ample supply of administrators and institutions to rule Pyongyang for a transitional period, until the formation of a new government. That is, if Beijing was prepared to accept the task at all, given its historical ties to Pyongyang, and the fact that China has become one of the last great defenders of the absolute inviolability of state sovereignty. That is a principle which Beijing has its own interests in defending, not least because it serves as a useful foil for deflecting foreign complaints about its repression in Tibet. Yet Beijing has also begun acting in ways which show an implicit understanding that the era of absolute state sovereignty is over. It has supported U.N.-blessed military actions, and even sent a contingent of police to participate in peacekeeping in Haiti. A properly sanctioned military intervention in North Korea could readily be portrayed as consistent with international law, and China's desire for a U.N.-centered world order.

There is also evidence that Chinese thinking is beginning to shift away from its old unquestioning support for North Korea. Chinese leaders are widely reported to be frustrated by Pyongyang's intransigent attitude in the multilateral talks about its nuclear programs, and worried about Russian arms sales to Pyongyang. Last August, the military-backed magazine "Strategy and Management" even published an article by a Chinese scholar denouncing Pyongyang as a dangerous and ungrateful regime. Although that was a step farther than Beijing is prepared to go at present -- prompting the magazine's closure -- it demonstrated that the disadvantages of continuing to back Pyongyang are beginning to be more widely recognized.

The worry is that China would use such an intervention to attain wider imperialist objectives in Asia, including possibly a takeover of Taiwan. However, any intervention would be seen by the rest of Asia as precisely a test of that proposition and Beijing would make sure it did not lose the opportunity to prove itself a responsible new great power in Asia.

Is this all so much pie in the sky? Asians tend to forget that they are partly responsible for the emergence of the notion of humanitarian intervention in the post-World War II era. In the case of India's invasion of East Pakistan (today's Bangladesh) in 1971 and Vietnam's of Cambodia in 1978, Asian countries intervened in neighbors that were suffering humanitarian disasters.

Unilateralism has been the norm, not the exception, in humanitarian interventions since at least the 19th century. Today, there is a strong argument that a unilateral, albeit widely supported, Chinese action against the regime in North Korea would be good for the world. Accepting this solution would require that all the major parties -- China, Russia, the U.S., South Korea and Japan -- think of a new paradigm and abandon their entrenched positions which have combined to allow a hermit kingdom fuelled by rockets and starvation to destabilize a region of great potential.

Mr. Gilley is co-author, with Andrew J. Nathan, of "China's New Rulers" (New York Review of Books, 2003).
 

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Danse Macabre!
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MR HARLEY said:
I dont understand where we even get all this money .....??

Arent we in debt anyway?

Dont we have to have the gold to back our money's value up ?
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Just borrow more money, if there's one thing a president who set a record debt only to smash that record later in his term knows, it's that you can just borrow as much as you want without any consequences.
 

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my sister is #1 best prostitute
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i think bush want to drop the value of the dollar to less then the yen or turkish lira..
 

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Danse Macabre!
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I only read the first few paragraphs of that article but

Beijing should invade North Korea on humanitarian grounds and establish a China-backed transitional regime there. The U.S. and its allies in Asia should provide diplomatic and logistical support to the operation, while the U.N. should provide its legal blessing.

Seldom has there been a regime more deserving of being overthrown on humanitarian grounds. North Korea is one of the great disasters of our time. A famine from 1995 to 1998 killed between 600,000 and one million people -- 4% of the population. Even today a third of the population is malnourished. Basic rights simply do not exist. All of this is because of a cruel and unreformed communist regime that makes Saddam's Iraq look like a paragon of justice. As if these humanitarian considerations were not enough, North Korea's nuclear programs pose a major threat to world peace and raise the specter of proliferation of WMD. So too do its biological and chemical-weapons programs, which have so far received far less international attention. In short, there is a firm basis for a just war to topple Kim Jong Il.
sounds an awful lot like the weak ass justification used to invade Iraq, and look how well that turned out...
 

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My problem with the article is this; If China ever attacked NK, NK won't hesitate in nuking Beijing. Bruce Gilley never touched on that fact. Also don't see how China could use humanitarian grounds to invade NK anyway.
 

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Danse Macabre!
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Let alone why would they want to go through the hassle of a transitional government and all that sh*t? If China wanted to invade anyone, they would bomb the f*ck out of them, blow their sh*t up, do what they wanted to do and say "go f*ck yourselves" and leave. They abrely care about their own people, why would they care about how well a country they invaded fares?
 

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On the Iraq situation, what pisses me off is the poor post war planning. It obviously looks like preschoolers drawed up that plan, its makes the US look uncoordinated which is sign of weakness in coming future conflicts.
 

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elTwitcho said:
Let alone why would they want to go through the hassle of a transitional government and all that sh*t? If China wanted to invade anyone, they would bomb the f*ck out of them, blow their sh*t up, do what they wanted to do and say "go f*ck yourselves" and leave. They abrely care about their own people, why would they care about how well a country they invaded fares?
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More than likely thats what Taiwan will get. Don't really understand why China would invade an ally that would be useful in any future operations.
 

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I don't understand why anyone think's its necessary to raise taxes in order to save money. The government is the least efficient spender of all time - we need to cut as much sh*t as we can, privitize everything else, and we will be out of debt in a matter of years.
 
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