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Breeding P.cariba

Posted 10 September 2012 - 08:58 AM (#1) User is offline   memento 

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I know some of you tried breeding P.cariba several times, and simulated the seasonal changes at those attempts.

A question about that - did anyone ever try this, in the exact periods of the year that they normally spawn in the wild ?
Seasonal breeding species have a adapted/evolved an annual cycle, in which the gonadosomatic index and hormone levels are exactly adapted to these natural seasons...

For example, an attempt in the period august to januar, will probably fail because in the wild, this is the "post spawning" period in which the gonadosomatic index as well as the hormone levels, are just too low for a succesfull spawning.
Taking into account both seasonal simulation ánd these reproduction biological factors, best chances for a succesfull spawning would be to start the simulation in April / May, and try a spawning in June / July.

Has anyone ever tried this, and care to share their experiences on it ?
For more info on this, please read here : http://home.telfort....baspawning.html

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This post has been edited by memento: 10 September 2012 - 08:58 AM

"There are two aspects of life: science, and the rest. In the first only logics is at work.
Subjectivity, sentiment, ideology, friendship, etc. has nothing to do with it."

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 11:11 PM (#2) User is offline   Fishnut2 

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I know this is an old post. But thanks for the link. I for one...appreciate it!
:thumbsup:


Update: The link isn't working anymore. Any Caribe info is welcome.

This post has been edited by Fishnut2: 12 July 2013 - 11:14 PM

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 06:42 AM (#3) User is offline   memento 

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That's right, took the site offline on April 1st since I just didn't have the time to keep it updated anymore.
Just took it back online again, but with the warning that it isn't updated anymore.

Links should be working, the domain piranha-info.eu will be working soon.
"There are two aspects of life: science, and the rest. In the first only logics is at work.
Subjectivity, sentiment, ideology, friendship, etc. has nothing to do with it."

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 01:12 PM (#4) User is offline   BRUNER247 

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Any info on the water conductivity during these different seasons? I've been talking to ray breeders about conductivity levels. Everything can be just right but if the conductivity is off they won't spawn. And it seems many of the harder fish to spawn are the same way.
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Posted 31 August 2013 - 10:19 PM (#5) User is offline   memento 

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Funny you mention that. I've been ridiculed for mentioning I believed the humidity played a role in the spawning process. "How can a fish sense the humidity in the air above it ?"
The humidity however, is a large factor in conductivity that indeed can be sensed by the fish.

I wouldn' worry too much about the exact figures. Just keep in mind what most people seem to forget - the aquarium itself should be a simulation of the entire biotope.
A high or low humidity is easily achieved by lowering or raising the temperature of the air just above the water. Conductivity will alter according to it.
"There are two aspects of life: science, and the rest. In the first only logics is at work.
Subjectivity, sentiment, ideology, friendship, etc. has nothing to do with it."

Jacques Géry.
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Posted 09 September 2013 - 12:08 AM (#6) User is offline   BRUNER247 

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Hmmm. I'm not sayn your wrong combi about humidity effecting conductivity but what I was reading and what I took from it was. Conductivity changes by the amount of waste, and minerals in your water. The higher the levels of waste(ammonia,nitrate,nitrite,ect) the higher your conductivity will be. It also said depending on the conductivity of your tap water, you could be adding more with waterchanges instead of it lowering.
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Posted 12 September 2013 - 11:46 AM (#7) User is offline   JustJoshinYa 

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i would assume nitrates play the biggest role in conductivity in the home aquaria. since nitrates are one of the compounds we aim to keep as low as possible, maybe we are doing ourselves a disjustice trying to achieve this "perfect" chemistry in our tanks. id be curious to know realistically what the nitrate levels and shifts are throughout the seasons in the wild. id assume in the dry season there would be a spike in nitrates for obvious reasons.

never thought about conductivity when it comes to spawning, thats very insightful.

Posted 28 September 2013 - 12:38 PM (#8) User is offline   BRUNER247 

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I think its more important that we think. I've been messing with the conductivity levels in mac tank and was really expecting anything and today I noticed macs looking lil rough and female very dark while male half heartedly fanning. I siphoned to check and sure as sh*t I had a mac spawning a couple days ago!
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Posted 29 September 2013 - 09:16 AM (#9) User is offline   memento 

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View PostJustJoshinYa, on 12 September 2013 - 11:46 AM, said:

i would assume nitrates play the biggest role in conductivity in the home aquaria. since nitrates are one of the compounds we aim to keep as low as possible, maybe we are doing ourselves a disjustice trying to achieve this "perfect" chemistry in our tanks. id be curious to know realistically what the nitrate levels and shifts are throughout the seasons in the wild. id assume in the dry season there would be a spike in nitrates for obvious reasons.

never thought about conductivity when it comes to spawning, thats very insightful.


Those "perfect" levels as being thought in the hobby, are far from natural.
As you mention yourself, during the dry season the ammonia and nitrates are sky-high in the natural ecosystem. And with the start of the wet season, they spawn. So the natural levels, are the ones we are used to consider impossible and horrible.
However in serious seasonal simulations, most people switch off their filtrations to allow these levels to rise.

Also, if I remember correctly, Jim Smith mentioned his belief that air pressure was a trigger in his cariba-breeding.
"There are two aspects of life: science, and the rest. In the first only logics is at work.
Subjectivity, sentiment, ideology, friendship, etc. has nothing to do with it."

Jacques Géry.
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Posted 29 December 2013 - 12:57 AM (#10) User is offline   Canso 

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Not sure on humidity, but barometric pressure makes a big difference in all fish types. I know a storm is coming when all my reds turn black and start nesting.
reds, terns, caribe, 320gal.
17˝“ Rhomb, 180gal.
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Posted 09 November 2015 - 09:50 PM (#11) User is offline   Dairy Whip 

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Very interesting stuff. I didn't have to do anything to make my reds breed :p ahaha jokes them suckers breed like crazy no matter what.... who's this Jim Smith ? I know I've missed a lot not being on here in years. But he had success with breeding caribe in captivity? I remember back when this was huge, A few ppl were trying very hard to get these different breeds of piranhas to breed. So as I've missed a lot what have ppl had success on here breeding now. As i stated last I remember reds were the only P's anyone on here were breeding. :thumbsup:
Yeah I Got A Tank, With A Few Piranhas
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