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Piranha life-span? How long do they live? Rate Topic: -----

Posted 13 March 2003 - 03:51 AM (#1) User is offline   Atlanta Braves Baby! 

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I just got my 6 baby RBs last week, and I just got to wondering how long on average RB P live in captivity? Also how big do they usually get? Do they grow to the size of their tanks?  :laugh:
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Posted 13 March 2003 - 04:19 AM (#2) User is offline   bobme 

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they grow to about 12 inches in the home tank.
they should be keept in a large tank. Min 20 gals per fish.

In captivity they can live up to around 20 years if keept well.
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Posted 13 March 2003 - 04:52 AM (#3) User is offline   MPower 

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12" is very rare but 10" is common.

Posted 13 March 2003 - 06:04 AM (#4) User is offline   RhomZilla 

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12 is rare but can be achieve if your dedicated to the hobby. Also, plays an important role in maturity/growth of a fish.
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Posted 13 March 2003 - 02:00 PM (#5) User is offline   bobme 

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RhomZilla, on Mar 13 2003, 11:04 AM, said:

12 is rare but can be achieve if your dedicated to the hobby. Also, plays an important role in maturity/growth of a fish.

I also belive its more rare becuase people dont give thier Piranha enuff room.
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Posted 13 March 2003 - 02:05 PM (#6) User is offline   hastatus 

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Size of aquario does play an important role including proper temperature and occasional water changes. As for rare in size? not really, maybe in some home aquariums but not public aquariums.

Posted 13 March 2003 - 02:53 PM (#7) User is offline   SnowCichlid. 

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yep 12" is there size for adult, of course you may encounter a midget one or something to that affect that wont make it all the way... just like we have tall and short people LOL
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Posted 13 March 2003 - 03:00 PM (#8) User is offline   Poseidon X 

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Posted 13 March 2003 - 04:13 PM (#9) User is offline   Mr. Hannibal 

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As far as i know they live between 10-20 years!
Piranhas i have now:
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Pygocentrus cariba, Serrasalmus rhombeus, Serrasalmus irritans, Serrasalmus eigenmanni, Serrasalmus elongatus, Serrasalmus manueli, Serrasalmus medinai, Serrasalmus neveriensis, Pristobrycon careospinus, Pristobrycon striolatus, Pristobrycon maculipinnis, Pygopristis denticulata, Catoprion mento


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Posted 13 March 2003 - 04:27 PM (#10) User is offline   hastatus 

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As far as i know they live between 10-20 years!
I have been following this post and saw many different ideas on the longevity of piranas. In truth, there is no cut off date on their age, only recorded examples of captivity. Well documented here in Oregon is a P. nattereri expiring at age 37. Not known if mortality was natural or other disease or parasite problems. There are photos of it and I plan to see about securing them for you all to see. Another one is being kept by a young lady in TN. Her P. nattereri is 33 years old. Another example is the S. rhombeus I discuss that was 30 years old when it was accidently killed. So here are a few examples of how long a P. nattereri could live and others as well. It all strictly depends on its health and how well you care for it.

Posted 13 March 2003 - 09:37 PM (#11) User is offline   Atlanta Braves Baby! 

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hastatus, on Mar 13 2003, 01:27 PM, said:

Quote

As far as i know they live between 10-20 years!
I have been following this post and saw many different ideas on the longevity of piranas. In truth, there is no cut off date on their age, only recorded examples of captivity. Well documented here in Oregon is a P. nattereri expiring at age 37. Not known if mortality was natural or other disease or parasite problems. There are photos of it and I plan to see about securing them for you all to see. Another one is being kept by a young lady in TN. Her P. nattereri is 33 years old. Another example is the S. rhombeus I discuss that was 30 years old when it was accidently killed. So here are a few examples of how long a P. nattereri could live and others as well. It all strictly depends on its health and how well you care for it.

Thanks for chiming in hastatus, I was hoping you would have an for my question. You obviously know alot of information based on the past post I have read from you. Thanks dude :brow:
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Posted 13 March 2003 - 10:51 PM (#12) User is offline   hastatus 

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You're very welcome.

Posted 13 March 2003 - 10:58 PM (#13) User is offline   Outie 

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Hastatus just out of curiosity have you or others in your field ever notice if a pirahnas life span is ever affected with the many different times and generations of breeding them in captivity. (red bellies) compared to the life span of those that are wild breed.

Posted 14 March 2003 - 12:15 AM (#14) User is offline   hastatus 

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have you or others in your field ever notice if a pirahnas life span is ever affected with the many different times and generations of breeding them in captivity.
Can of worms topic. There are some reports (not with piranas) about inbreeding and problems associated with it. And if you live in Oregon, the salmon are a big topic of discussion on how much genetics are effected on wild stock. There are 2 sides to this argument. Those that say genetics are not effected, therefore farm-raised vs wild stock is the same. And those of the scientific side that say wild stock is effected by farm raised. Genetics as is my understanding shows no differences between the two. But whether or not the migratory habits of salmon is effected is still unknown. Sorry to diverge from your question, but this is all that is known. Generally, I always suggest replenishing tank raised with wild stock to keep the colors true. As for the rest, its anybodies guess.

Posted 18 February 2006 - 03:21 AM (#15) User is offline   no_mercy 

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usually they will outlast you

Posted 18 February 2006 - 04:46 AM (#16) User is offline   C0Rey 

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View Postno_mercy, on Feb 18 2006, 09:21 AM, said:

usually they will outlast you


u are the master of bumping!!!  :laugh:
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Posted 18 February 2006 - 05:22 AM (#17) User is offline   bmpower007 

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All depends on the condition they are kept and the amount of space given as far as I know they will grow as long as they are alive.
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